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Forum - Personal Charts: Your Special Occasion Charts - Jinx makes End of Year Lists (Pt. 3)

Part 2 (2000-2004) here: https://australian-charts.com/forum.asp?todo=viewthread&id=46695

If you thought I was done at the year 2000, that would be a very fair assumption to make because these lists take a very long time to make. But no, I've kept at it and have recently finished a 1999 list, and man, it's a hot one. I might change things up depending on how it goes but I'm looking at streaming it from 5pm AEDST on Wednesday this week. It'll be at the usual place here http://myradiostream.com/station/flashplayer.php?s=s6&p=14748

If you need something to hype yourself up for that, here's a bunch of songs that won't be appearing on it, because I made a top 250 of the 2000s list ages ago and am just now posting it https://pastebin.com/TgyFzvQt

But I still have to write 11 more commentaries so I'll stop wasting my time padding out this post.
The 90s were a nice place Looking forward to seeing your list.
1999

I don't wanna go back, back to 1999. I hate to agree with the sunscreen song but nostalgia is often a bit of a miss that reveals itself once you realise how much of what you take for granted now has only recently started existing. Either way I don't miss being small and extremely limited in my options.

But still music keeps on existing and is good. I've been looking forward to reaching the '90s for this thing to finally see for myself how it really weighs up. I had a warped perception as someone who leans towards genres of music that were at their peak in this era, that the '90s really were where it's at, and it will certainly be interesting to see if I ever see a dramatic change in the way the lists stack up. For 1999 it's certainly inconclusive, but it has been interesting to see just how much of this list didn't come from my pre-existing iTunes library. Some albums I'd not heard a single song from prior to this have come up remarkably strong in here.

But if you would leave after reading this it'd be a crying shame, so listen in here http://myradiostream.com/station/flashplayer.php?s=s6&p=14748
100. Texas - In Our Lifetime

You might remember Texas's 1999 album for the fact that not one of its singles really took off here despite being primed to do so considering it followed their most well known hit just a year before. It probably just isn't the right mood in comparison. I have a lot of nostalgia for this song which I only recently realised because for some reason my mum had this album and seemingly played it a lot because I'm really familiar with all the singles. "In Our Lifetime" is perhaps the most tasteful of those with its blissful uplifting pop sound.

99. Grinspoon - Ready 1

Holds up really nicely. It's one of the Grinspoon song titles I've known the longest but I don't think I heard the song for quite a while after it. I like the title though, it's much more distinctive than if it were called "Already One", fitting the frenetic energy of the track too.

Past entries:
2007Black Tattoo#97

98. American Football - Never Meant

The first self-titled American Foolball album is not an overly gratifying listen as it's very minimalist and doesn't provide much in the way of hooks. This isn't me cheesing it off as not being accessible enough because I'm pretty sure that's half of the point. "Never Meant" is sometimes seen as a meme for being the most straightforward song on the album, though I did nearly also include "I'll See You When We're Both Not So Emotional" in this list too. The guitar noodling in here is rather distinct and memorable.

97. Pet Shop Boys - I Don't Know What You Want But I Can't Give It Anymore

Sneaking closer and closer to Pet Shop Boys in their prime and look at that form improvement from 3 years prior! Nonetheless I'll avoid the low effort puns and note that this is pretty much what you're after from these two. Remarkably layered to compensate being a little lengthy, so there's a fair bit to get out of this.

Past entries:
2002Home and Dry#99

96. Pavement - Carrot Rope

This is the last song on Pavement's last album. Because of how it's listed on the back of the CD, even Spotify calls it "...And Carrot Rope". From what I know of Pavement, this is a bit of a goofy song as vocal lines run over each other, while the chorus tricks you into thinking it'll be more chill than it ends up being.

95. Jimmy Eat World - Lucky Denver Mint

I'm not sure I even realised Jimmy Eat World were making music this far back. It's certainly not far removed from their later material and feels a bit ahead of its time for that. While it's far from their most explosive chorus, it still serves rather well at it.

Past entries:
2001Bleed American#3
2001The Middle#62
2004Pain#29
2005Disintegration#3
2010My Best Theory#19

94. The Chemical Brothers - Hey Boy Hey Girl

Long time coming for this song. I specifically remember doing my 2008 work experience where there was a radio playing in the background. I picked up a small handful of songs I learnt to dislike via that, notably this one with its annoying hook, which all made me a bit disappointed to learn it was The Chemical Brothers as I reasonably liked the two songs of theirs I knew from 2007. Long after that though I've wanted to like this song more because it has a monster of an instrumental behind it. Nowadays I don't mind the vocals apart from the fact that they don't properly match up with the title and I'm not sure why they did that.

Past entries:
2002Star Guitar#35
2002Come With Us#71
2005Galvanize (feat Q-Tip)#25

93. Kelis (feat Pusha T) - Good Stuff

Though I'm aware he's been around for quite a long time, hearing Pusha T turn up out of nowhere on a 1999 Kelis song was quite a surprise for me. I'm not sure if I knew this song before or I've just fabricated fake nostalgia from making this list (more on that later) but it sounds like a recognisable hit. At the very least the 'huh-uh!' hook does. YUGGHCK!

Past entries (Kelis):
2002Help Me (with Timo Maas)#40
2003Milkshake#86

Past entries (Pusha T):
2010Runaway (with Kanye West)#13
2012Mercy (with Kanye West)#45
2014Meltdown (with Stromae)#34

92. Dr. Dre (feat Eminem & Xzibit) - What's The Difference

SEAN DE PAUL AND BLU...I mean not really but at the same time, what's the difference? Hearing this song for the first time is a real head turner and it never really stops feeling weird to realise this entire instrumental was sampled. "2001" is a fun listen but the highlights aren't super frequent. This track is a great one though, strong verses from everyone, and c'mon, we all know that instrumental rules.

Past entries (Eminem):
2000Stan (feat Dido)#10
2000Kim#60
2000The Real Slim Shady#79
2000The Way I Am#88
2002Without Me#28
2002Lose Yourself#31

91. Boredoms - (spiral)

Boredoms' album from 1999 is a rather peculiar listen, where genre tags can't really properly explain what you're getting into. I can't really even describe this song except for its blistering guitar solos particularly near the end of the track which are why it's in here.
90. Orbital - Nothing Left 2

At long last, one of those legendary 8 minute dance tracks from the UK Chart makes it in here! Well it's cheating a bit because Orbital are on the more credible side of things and this technically wasn't a chart entry on its own. There are in fact two Nothing Left tracks as the name partially implies, and I nearly considered combining them for this list as the first one segues into this, which would make for a 17 minute track but I decided against it. Much like Pendulum's two part "The Island" track, this second one is where the payoff really hits. Also notably the vocalist who you probably won't recognise is actually Alison Goldfrapp.

89. MF DOOM (feat Pebbles The Invisible Girl) - Doomsday

I can't imagine it was intentional but "Operation: Doomsday" was released on 4/20. This is effectively the first track and MF DOOM's most popular solo track. It's impressive just how much he already feels like he's in his element even on his really early work. The production is a little dated but his flow & voice are as sharp as ever.

Past entries (MF DOOM):
2003Raid (as Madvillain) (feat MED)#37
2003America's Most Blunted (as Madvillain)#87
2004Accordian (as Madvillain)#45
2004All Caps (as Madvillain)#48
2004Rhinestone Cowboy (as Madvillain)#78
2004Curls (as Madvillain)#85
2004Figaro (as Madvillain)#91
2004Meat Grinder (as Madvillain)#97
2005Sofa King (as Dangerdoom)#47
2005Benzie Box (as Dangerdoom) (feat Cee-Lo)#50
2016Frankie Sinatra (with The Avalanches)#30

88. Cibo Matto - Sci-Fi Wasabi

It's highly likely that you don't recognise this name but you almost certainly will recognise a voice from it, because one of the two vocalists of this peculiar US/Japanese band was the original voice of Noodle from Gorillaz. They're a very strange band with their mix of genres but are most noted for their high tendency to write songs about food. Of the songs I've heard, "Sci-Fi Wasabi" clicked the most with its upbeat production, booming chorus, and what sounds like the coin sound effect from when you boot up Super Mario 64.

87. The Roots (feat Dice Raw) - Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New

It's honestly difficult to say anything worthwhile about this apart from it just being The Roots at their typical best. There's a great beat switch that makes for an intense transition of verse.

Past entries (The Roots):
2002The Seed (2.0) (feat Cody ChesnuTT)#4
2006Don't Feel Right (feat Maimouna Youssef)#94

86. David Bowie - Thursday's Child

Well it's the radio edit from the GH set because I couldn't be bothered buying the song again but it's basically the same song. What I've heard of '90s Bowie is a peculiar thing, kind of an expected case of an aging star trying to connect with more modern times. This isn't really the modus operandi of "Thursday's Child" though, a more sombre ballad that could have been released in any era (though the backing vocals do feel very '90s). Scholars often consider this the companion piece to "Friday" by Rebecca Black, as it compliments the sequence of days mentioned in that song by mentioning the other 4 in order.

Past entries:
2003New Killer Star#81
2016Lazarus#53
2016Girl Loves Me#56
2016Sue (Or In A Season Of Crime)#97

85. Coldplay - Brothers & Sisters

I am kind of astounded at just how many times Coldplay have wound up on my lists and they're still not done even beyond the release of "Parachutes" as we now go to their early EPs. The song I've heard that hooked me the most was this one, which is very much in line with their occasional jangle pop sound of the first two albums. The way the instrumental production meshes here reminds me a fair bit of this era of Radiohead so there's another shoe-horned comparison, but there are no surprises when a younger band wants to emulate those which they surely admire.

Past entries:
2000Yellow#64
2000Don't Panic#87
2000Spies#93
2002Daylight#13
2002Politik#14
2002The Scientist#54
2002God Put A Smile Upon Your Face#64
2005X&Y#39
2005What If#88
2008Violet Hill#45
2011Moving To Mars#51

84. Ghostface Killah (feat Raekwon) - Apollo Kids

Also not done is "Supreme Clientele", which was rolling out singles quite a while before it was released in the year 2000. Not much to say here but that it's just more of what made all the highlights on that album from the last countdown so great, booming production and engaging bars. Raekwon is here so the list of individually credited Wu-Tang members on these lists continues to grow.

Past entries (Ghostface Killah):
2000One#42
2000Buck 50 (feat Cappadonna, Method Man & Redman)#45
2000Nutmeg (feat RZA)#49
2000Malcolm#89
2006You Know I'm No Good (with Amy Winehouse)#57

83. Sigur Rós - Ágætis Byrjun

Sigur Rós have basically been an institution as long as I can remember and when that happens it's easy to forget that there has to be a reason for such a following, and my understanding is that it largely harks back to their 1999 album which I don't have the name of in front of me but I imagine I can't spell it anyway. There's a lot to love in it though, as they don't just use their post-rock style as a crutch but more of a starting point to develop songs in interesting ways. I particularly like the shift in chord progression that happens a few minutes into this song, which raises the emotional intensity.

Past entries:
2002Untitled #7 (Dauðalagið)#50
2002Untitled #1 (Vaka)#55
2005Hoppípolla#28
2007Hljómalind#98
2008Gobbledigook#62
2008Inní Mér Syngur Vitleysingur#98

82. Blur - Tender

It's highly likely that you don't recognise this name but you almost certainly will recognise a voice from it, because the vocalist of this peculiar UK band was the original voice of 2D from Gorillaz. There's something to be said of the excess of Britpop and just generally a lot of '90s rock with a prevailing ideal that more is better. So many songs have been soured by trying to extend codas far beyond reason in hopes of being the next "Hey Jude". "Tender" works for me though, because it feels like the song is nothing but coda. The song is over 7 and a half minutes long but it never feels that long when I listen to it. It's also a simple but effective mantra and a really beautiful song.

Past entries:
2010Fool's Day#60

81. Foo Fighters - Stacked Actors

For me, Foo Fighters are often at their best when a little unhinged, it's why I love their 2011 album "Wasting Light" so much, as it genuinely gets that rough & ready feel that they so often want to go for but frequently get muddied down in bland radio anthems. The lead guitar in "Stacked Actors" frequently makes for a great racket, and speaking of racket, 'ack' is a great syllable to match the off kilter vibe.

Past entries:
2002All My Life#24
2002Low#89
2005No Way Back#66
2007The Pretender#41
2011Bridge Burning#28
2011Rope#40
2011Arlandria#70
80. The Dismemberment Plan - Gyroscope

I've been faking nostalgia a lot in my life (more on that later) so it might just be from this list making but the cover to this album is vividly familiar for something I never listened to, perhaps it was someone's avatar on something. Anyway, "Emergency & I" is great if you're ever looking for some heavily hook-laden but also complex and creatively written indie rock. The vocalist gives me heavy Car Seat Headrest vibes with the way the lyrics are shot out to fit the meter. I was a little concerned listening to the lyrics which initially read as pretty gross, but in the full context of the song it's quite a moving story of having to mask your true feelings to get through it, come on, come on, come on.

79. Fiona Apple - On The Bound

If I need to fill a word count quota of some sort then all I need to do is read out the name of this album. But nonetheless Fiona Apple's ode to Chess is a rather compelling album and I find myself particularly drawn to this opening track. The jaunty piano makes an instant impression and I also find her big husky singing moments to be quite compelling alongside it.

78. Bloodhound Gang - The Bad Touch

This is a really dumb song but it's also surprisingly clever. Only the Bloodhound Gang would put so much effort into their innuendo that the joke often comes from just how roundabout they go to talk about sex. It's a very '90s song with regards to so, so many of its lyrics too which makes it a fascinating artifact. The main thing that helps the song endure though is that it manages to work as a stupidly catchy dance track. I don't even know if I knew what they were talking about at all but hearing a song on the radio mentioning The Discovery Channel was so funny to me as a kid and it was a big favourite when it came out.

77. Beth Orton - Stolen Car

I've listened to a bunch of Beth Orton's songs for this project to the point that she feels like a familiar face in it even though she really isn't. This song really clicked with me though. I need to stop saying it over and over again but the songwriting approach in this is so very '90s. It reminds me a fair amount of "Carnival" by Natalie Merchant with how breezy and articulate it is. I could totally imagine a version of this that's totally focus grouped to hell and back with all the rough edges cut out to be a popular hit because the hooks are there, but I rather like it like this.

76. Mos Def - UMI Says

I mostly know Mos Def for his song "Auditorium" and also some guest appearances here and there. So this is another case of an unexpected artist to learn has actually released critically acclaimed work, but indeed his 1999 album "Black On Both Sides" is pretty great. "UMI Says" is a bit different to the bigger songs on the album as it's more singing than it is rapping. As a chill moment it's quite cathartic but the message is still just as potent.

Past entries:
2004Two Words (with Kanye West)#72
2010Stylo (with Gorillaz)#63

75. Tori Amos - Bliss

I'm almost certain that I should like Tori Amos a lot but I just haven't gone deeply enough into her catalogue. From what I have heard though, "Bliss" is a big highlight. A dark song but with an uplifting chorus. I refuse to believe she is actually saying 'bliss' just because I've been fooled before.

74. Augie March - Asleep In Perfection

This is a rather chill section! Even the song titles are reflecting it at this point. A big breakout hit for Augie March here, this is a really lovely song that I don't have much to say about. The bridge feels very inspired by Powderfinger though I do like the tension in it.

Past entries:
2001There Is No Such Place#43
2002This Train Will Be Taking No Passengers#25
2002Little Wonder#65
2006One Crowded Hour#3
2006The Cold Acre#27
2006Stranger Strange#96
2008Watch Me Disappear#100

73. Emilíana Torrini - Dead Things

Though she hasn't appeared in these lists very often at all, I do have a lot of love for Emilíana Torrini. As I've often said, I find her voice hits the closest approximation to what I love in Owl Eyes. As an added bonus, I took a particular liking to her 1999 album which really hits the right spot with its somewhat trip hop inspired production. "Dead Things" makes for quite a moody affair.

Past entries:
2009Me and Armini (Dan Carey Mix)#47

72. The Cranberries - Promises

The Cranberries are pretty good hey? They don't always hit it out of the park but they have a nice mix of styles and a good ear for melody at times. "Promises" is not remotely one of their most well known songs and I didn't know it at all before this but it's become one of my favourites. I do admittedly wish the production was a little more crisp, but I do really enjoy it when Dolores really gets to cut loose on the chorus.

71. XTC - Harvest Festival

Back when I was younger, not young enough that I wasn't already on this site, but long enough ago that many people reading this may well not remember, I had a certain fascination with my alphabetised reviews list. I was fascinated at one point with the idea of having done so many reviews that every single letter of the alphabet could potentially have an entire page to itself. For most letters that's a trivia affair but of course there are those later letters that are harder to come by. So pretty much entirely because their name started with the letter X, I listened to a lot of XTC. I didn't even know their bigger songs at that point but nonetheless I found myself liking them quite a lot. I don't think I stumbled upon much if any of their late '90s material so that has been new to me for this. I ended up buying their 1999 album largely because it's not on Spotify and I quite like it. I wouldn't say it's their best album but late in their career there are still some rather inspired moments like this one. They're so creative and unique with their approach to lyrics & melody, making for a really enjoyable listen.
70. Emilíana Torrini - Baby Blue

Because you treat me like shi...wait never mind. This is a rather sorrowful track though. Not quite the sorrow of always having snow in your driveway but you get what you get. It's when the title does come around that this song hits its high mark for me however, as it's punctuated with a really lovely chord to accentuate the mood.

Past entries:
1999Dead Things#73
2009Me and Armini (Dan Carey Mix)#47

69. Something For Kate - Electricity

This is one of the first Something For Kate songs I heard that wasn't from their 2006 album, because it was played on JTV one day. I can't exactly remember the context but I remember parsing from it that this was their debut single. It's not even close but it was their first top 50 hit so I guess it was a big deal in that sense. It took me a while to latch onto the song as the hook didn't really come through in a way that I was accustomed to. In fact it's a really strange one where it's mainly building up to a faster guitar riff, which I now have to say sounds really nice.

Past entries:
2001Monsters#4
2001Jerry, Stand Up#31
2001Say Something#47
2001Stunt Show#71
2001Happy Endings#83
2001Three Dimensions#94
2003Déjà-vu#13
2003Kaplan/Thornhill#78
2006Cigarettes and Suitcases#22
2006California#43
2012Survival Expert#47

68. The Dismemberment Plan - 8 1/2 Minutes

It's okay it's not even 3 minutes long. This is one of those songs that is an absolute mess everywhere except for the chorus which makes it ever so out of place. It's just a brief super catchy hook surrounded by math rock and elaborate dystopian lyrics.

Past entries:
1999Gyroscope#80

67. Filter - The Best Things

Filter's "Title Of Record" album is peculiar to me because it feels like two different albums awkwardly meshed into one. The album before and after "Take A Picture" is in two very different places and I wonder how it was for people who bought the album on the strength of that single. It's not in this list but I do still really like it, one of the stranger sounding radio rock hits. I find myself quite enjoying Filter's more industrial side, which is at times still pretty radio friendly.

66. The Roots - The Spark

Something you might notice distinctly in this song is that Black Thought isn't even on it. All of the rapping in this song is done by Malik B, who actually left the group right after this album came out. Incidentally it's quite a heavy song dealing with personal & international issues that I won't even pretend to fully comprehend. It's provocative though, it gets the people making that reference again.

Past entries:
1999Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New (feat Dice Raw)#87
2002The Seed (2.0) (feat Cody ChesnuTT)#4
2006Don't Feel Right (feat Maimouna Youssef)#94

65. Something For Kate - Whatever You Want

For a lot of people this is a massive highlight in Something For Kate's catalogue. If memory serves me correctly, Kingsmill named it one of his favourite songs of all time, and it's something that took me a while to get to grips with. Once again Something For Kate aren't really taking the most crowd-pleasing approach. The song is really mellow and barely has a chorus, but it still works like that. Surely one of Paul's greatest vocal performances.

Past entries:
1999Electricity#69
2001Monsters#4
2001Jerry, Stand Up#31
2001Say Something#47
2001Stunt Show#71
2001Happy Endings#83
2001Three Dimensions#94
2003Déjà-vu#13
2003Kaplan/Thornhill#78
2006Cigarettes and Suitcases#22
2006California#43
2012Survival Expert#47

64. Emilíana Torrini - Unemployed In Summertime

This is much more in line with what I'm used to with her music as a pretty chill song. The unique flourishes can be found though, and there's a rather strong bass simmering in the background. The lyrics are appropriately calming to go with it.

Past entries:
1999Baby Blue#70
1999Dead Things#73
2009Me and Armini (Dan Carey Mix)#47

63. Muse - Sunburn

One last hurrah for Muse as I've at last reached their first album. "Showbiz" often gets brushed aside when people talk of Muse's career peak but I find it a bit underrated and it holds up pretty well. Certainly the albums that followed were more ambitious but it's still an exciting band here with engaging ideas. "Sunburn" is pretty typical of Muse with the light piano and chugging riffs, but with enough going for it that it's always been one of my favourites.

Past entries:
2001Plug In Baby#2
2001Citizen Erased#11
2001New Born#14
2001Bliss#20
2001Futurism#57
2001Space Dementia#67
2001Hyper Music#91
2002Dead Star#19
2003Stockholm Syndrome#3
2003Hysteria#7
2003Sing For Absolution#10
2003Butterflies and Hurricanes#22
2003The Small Print#29
2003Fury#53
2003Thoughts Of A Dying Atheist#55
2003Time Is Running Out#62
2003Eternally Missed#74
2003Falling Away With You#85
2003Apocalypse Please#90
2006Knights Of Cydonia#5
2006Glorious#20
2006Assassin (Grand Omega Bosses Edit)#31
2006Starlight#38
2006Invincible#52
2009Unnatural Selection#13
2009Uprising#29
2009MK Ultra#53
2009Resistance#68
2010Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever)#75
2012Panic Station#67
2012Explorers#75
2015Reapers#86

62. Doves - Sea Song

There are a few songs on this list that are probably a little dodgy with their classification because it's not always easy to put together all the necessary information to make the right judgement call. This song was included on Doves' debut album in 2000 but was released prior on an EP in 1999. I don't know if it was different then but this is the judgement call I made and I think I made the opposite call elsewhere. As for this song though, it was an instantly appealing track with its repetitive instrumental riff that carries the song through its lengthy run time.

Past entries:
2000The Man Who Told Everything#25
2002Pounding#33
2002There Goes The Fear#95
2005Black and White Town#93
2009Kingdom Of Rust#46
2010Andalucía#27

61. Custard - Ringo (I Feel Like)

This is a pretty silly song but I've always taken a big liking to it. I'm inclined to say that it's because it reminds me of Custard's biggest hit, to the point that it even has an equivalent to the Julio Iglesias interlude. Relatively poppy for Custard, and it's a lot of fun.
60. Sleater-Kinney - Get Up

Finally breaking out of the 70s for a all time new peak, it's the semi-regular return for Sleater-Kinney. The lesson to be learned is that they've been consistently good for so many years which I probably would have cottoned onto sooner had they not gone about a decade without releasing new music. They're also consistent in that their sound hasn't really changed all that much in all those ensuing years, all of their recent entries they've had here could easily belong to the same album without it being too jarring.

Past entries:
2002Far Away#75
2005Jumpers#76
2015No Anthems#72

59. Dot Allison - Close Your Eyes (Steve Lironi Mix)

I'm pretty sure the version of this song isn't too important but this is the only one that's on Spotify and iTunes. Dot Allison is yet another artist I have become relatively aware of due to continually popping up while doing these lists, and "Close Your Eyes" has given me the best impression so far. Though she's known as an electronic producer, this feels more like an eclectic pop song, a bit similar to "Army Of Me" by Bjork actually.

58. Dr. Dre (feat Eminem) - Forgot About Dre

Given the popular trend with hip hop buyers to latch onto anything with Eminem's name attached, it really surprises me that this isn't a more popular song nowadays. Even without him, it feels like a really commonly referenced track, and yet in my experience of cataloguing iTunes purchases, it's not even the 2nd most popular song on "2001". It's not like Eminem's phoning it in here either, both his hook & verse contributions are very strong. In fact, the whole song comes together really well. There's no shortage of great instrumentals on this album and this one is quite a distinct entry.

Past entries (Dr. Dre):
1999What's The Difference (feat Eminem & Xzibit)#92

Past entries (Eminem):
1999What's The Difference (with Dr. Dre)#92
2000Stan (feat Dido)#10
2000Kim#60
2000The Real Slim Shady#79
2000The Way I Am#88
2002Without Me#28
2002Lose Yourself#31

57. Mos Def - Speed Law

This song just kept growing on me while making this list considering I nearly put it about 40 places lower. Compared to "UMI Says", this is Mos Def more in his element as he effortlessly flows over a subtle but effective beat.

Past entries:
1999UMI Says#76
2004Two Words (with Kanye West)#72
2010Stylo (with Gorillaz)#63

56. Kelis - Caught Out There

It really amazes me that this song was as much of a hit as it is. As potent as the message is, it doesn't feel like something that could easily fit on Australia's very safe radio playlists to reach enough of an audience, especially as The Neptunes' production style was far from established as a winning formula. This was their first ever hit in Australia in fact. Nonetheless as they would prove again in the future, it's a winning formula, alongside Kelis delivering one of the most memorable kiss offs in pop history, aaaarrghh!

Past entries:
1999Good Stuff (feat Pusha T)#93
2002Help Me (with Timo Maas)#40
2003Milkshake#86

55. Rage Against The Machine - Sleep Now In The Fire

I'm almost certain that this and "Testify" are both the same song but I could only really include one of them and I've known this one far longer. Oddly enough "Testify" is more popular on Spotify, but maybe being Track 1 on the album helps. Nonetheless this is an essential Rage track for me, the rollicking riff being a joy every time it comes through.

Past entries:
2000Renegades of Funk#67

54. Friendly (feat Sia) - Some Kind Of Love Song

Ah weren't these some wild times when Sia was so anonymous with her music that she wasn't actually credited on this song. I feel obliged to do so though because she's so central to the song's appeal. While it's not quite showing off her full vocal prowess, you can definitely get a sense of her idiosyncratic approach through the stilted delivery in this song. The song wouldn't be anywhere near as good without a vocalist of her caliber.

Past entries (Sia):
2000Little Man#65
2001Destiny (with Zero 7)#5
2001Distractions (with Zero 7)#68
2003Don't Bring Me Down#93
2004Sunday#19
2004Where I Belong#24
2004Sweet Potato#46
2004Breathe Me#53
2004The Church Of What's Happening Now#63
2004Somersault (with Zero 7)#65
2004Numb#98
2007Day Too Soon#68
2008Soon We'll Be Found#1
2008The Girl You Lost To Cocaine#8
2008I Go To Sleep#40
2008Academia#47
2009Buttons (CSS Remix)#43
2009You've Changed#48
2010Stop Trying#15
2010Never Gonna Leave Me#40
2010The Fight#51
2010Bring Night#56
2013Elastic Heart (feat The Weeknd & Diplo)#49
2015Alive#89

53. R.E.M. - The Great Beyond

I'm pretty sure this is the first R.E.M. song I ever knew, as it was a pretty big radio hit when I was a kid. I also remember rather liking it for its strangely worded chorus which left an impression on me for a long time. While I tend to lean towards the band's earlier albums more now, I've still got a lot of love for this one. The way that Stipe emotes some of the lines ('crashing to the ground', 'flowers in full bloom') really lifts the track.

Past entries:
2001Imitation Of Life#76

52. DMX - Party Up

I remember taking a really long time to find out what this song was called and I don't really think I can justify that when I've known how to use Google as long as I've used the internet. I suppose I can understand why DMX never had a top 50 hit in Australia but this one feels like it really should have been one, just for how recognisable it is. At least we had Israel Cruz's unforgettable song of the same name manage to get up in here, up in here.

Past entries:
2003X Gon' Give It To Ya#21

51. Jimmy Eat World - Clarity

The title track to this album and my favourite. The way the guitar riff underpins the chorus is just so good and gives the song a really potent rough edge. Yet another track from this band that I could totally imagine winning over a relatively bigger audience, making for a shame that they're still only really thought of for one song of theirs.

Past entries:
1999Lucky Denver Mint#95
2001Bleed American#3
2001The Middle#62
2004Pain#29
2005Disintegration#3
2010My Best Theory#19

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50. Emilíana Torrini - Easy

"Easy" sure is easy listening. Instrumentally I get a bit of a Zero 7 vibe from it, which is to say that I am extremely pre-disposed to liking it. This is just ever so smooth, in what one might argue was the smoothest year in popular music.

Past entries:
1999Unemployed In Summertime#64
1999Baby Blue#70
1999Dead Things#73
2009Me and Armini (Dan Carey Mix)#47
49. The Dismemberment Plan - A Life Of Possibilities

This is the opening track on "Emergency & I" and serves as a fairly gentle way in, but it's also pretty quickly indicative of what's going to follow. For as mellow as it is, the syncopated drum loops, the guitar riffs, everything feels so off kilter. Things take a bit of a turn halfway in when the song reaches its proper peak.

Past entries:
19998 1/2 Minutes#68
1999Gyroscope#80
48. Mirwais - Disco Science

I'm not just saying that this song is in the list because it's the song from that scene in "Snatch", after all, I'd be proper f**ked if I started including songs I didn't even like in these lists. But it IS the song in that scene from "Snatch" and there's not much else I need to say except that I'm impressed at just how well the song stands up on its own devoid of the context. You could fit a jumbo jet across the amount of joy that sleazy synth line brings me. Just don't listen to it if you're travelling alongside Beth Orton, she wouldn't want you to damage the seats.
47. Muse - Uno

Here we are, the first ever Muse single and thus the last time they're appearing in this list...wait never mind it doesn't work that way. But it certainly raises a curious question as to why the song is called "Uno", to mark said occasion or the fact that the chorus says that 'You could have been number one', and if there's one thing Muse love doing, it's askewing the notion of properly mentioning song titles in the lyrics. It's an interesting choice for a single though, as it's a bit off the rails at times, did you ever notice that little wild western twang bit only shows up once in the whole song? There's certainly an element of mucking around to fill out a 3 and a half minute song here.

Past entries:
1999Sunburn#63
2001Plug In Baby#2
2001Citizen Erased#11
2001New Born#14
2001Bliss#20
2001Futurism#57
2001Space Dementia#67
2001Hyper Music#91
2002Dead Star#19
2003Stockholm Syndrome#3
2003Hysteria#7
2003Sing For Absolution#10
2003Butterflies and Hurricanes#22
2003The Small Print#29
2003Fury#53
2003Thoughts Of A Dying Atheist#55
2003Time Is Running Out#62
2003Eternally Missed#74
2003Falling Away With You#85
2003Apocalypse Please#90
2006Knights Of Cydonia#5
2006Glorious#20
2006Assassin (Grand Omega Bosses Edit)#31
2006Starlight#38
2006Invincible#52
2009Unnatural Selection#13
2009Uprising#29
2009MK Ultra#53
2009Resistance#68
2010Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever)#75
2012Panic Station#67
2012Explorers#75
2015Reapers#86
46. Spiderbait - Shazam!

Shit, what was this song called again, can anyone find out? Nonetheless as tends to be the case, I often like Spiderbait for their short & sharp tracks, which can definitely apply to this barely 2 minute song. I've always liked the way the music intensifies during the verses and it sounds like Kram is singing different syllables in time with it.

Past entries:
2001Outta My Head#27
2004Black Betty#77
45. Mos Def - Mathematics

Now onto the more famous single. This song is of course noted by the many statistics presented in the song which being 20 years out of date don't always hold up...40 percent of people own cell phones after all. It's such a good instrumental loop though, and it will shock nobody to know that the massive A Tribe Called Quest fan is very much into the sampling which is smooth like butter.

Past entries:
1999Speed Law#57
1999UMI Says#76
2004Two Words (with Kanye West)#72
2010Stylo (with Gorillaz)#63
44. Slipknot - Surfacing

Something I continue to learn is that in the right setting, I really like Slipknot a lot. I never got the best introduction to them since at my age they were the primary edgy band of choice and I wasn't prepared for that sort of loudness. When I did get to hearing them, I found out that they actually have more of a pop sensibility than you might think, and Corey Taylor is a really good vocalist. Is it just a little nihilistic? With that chorus?! Nonetheless it's easy to see why people might love it and furthermore ride for it.
43. M2M - Don't Say You Love Me

The big elephant in the room regarding this song is that it was released for the soundtrack for the first Pokemon movie. If you know much about me it won't surprise you to learn that I obviously saw that movie in theatres. I have no memory of this song from my childhood and I don't know why that is. Nonetheless in this current decade I've come to know it and realise that I really do love it. So if there's a lesson to be learnt it's that nostalgia for things from your childhood doesn't necessarily pertain to you overlooking faults because you didn't know any better at the time. It can of course mean that something not encountered from the era at the time works because it intrinsically feels like that era, and oh boy does this song ever, and who knows, maybe I wouldn't like this in another era. But then at the end of the day, what so often prevails for me is an effective melody, and the chorus of this song gets me every time. In particular I find that slight chord change on the lyric 'not before I'm ready' just hits that sweet spot for me, it reminds me of how I feel on "Hotline Bling".
42. The Roots (feat Dice Raw & Beanie Sigel) - Adrenaline!

These Roots entries have been generally pretty forceful and upbeat but this song also has the production on its side to add to the urgency. I mean when it's called "Adrenaline!" you've got to do something with that. The chorus of the song is clearly the most undercooked part of it but it's still remarkably engaging for me with its frenetic delivery.

Past entries (The Roots):
1999The Spark#66
1999Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New (feat Dice Raw)#87
2002The Seed (2.0) (feat Cody ChesnuTT)#4
2006Don't Feel Right (feat Maimouna Youssef)#94

Past entries (Dice Raw):
1999Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New (with The Roots)#87
41. Aphex Twin - Windowlicker

I mean this had to be in here didn't it? I imagine the provocative video had a lot to do with it, but this must be one of the strangest and most unsettling tracks to ever make it into the ARIA Charts. Does the song truly distinguish itself from Aphex Twin's catalogue to deserve so much attention? I haven't listened to very much of it so I can't say for myself, but I've had plenty of time to get accustomed to every nook and cranny of this song and it's really become a big favourite. I like the part where it sounds like someone is moaning.

Past entries:
2014minipops 67 [120.2] [source field mix]#87
40. Texas - Summer Son

I'm really surprised this song wasn't a hit here but then again as previously established, I have an above average familiarity with this Texas album so maybe this doesn't sound like quite the obvious smash to everyone else. What's interesting to me is that I've always thought of this as a surprising dance direction for the band but the more I listen to the song, the more it feels like straight up pop rock, as the song is very guitar driven. I particularly note the guitar riff that comes in just before the chorus, which sounds remarkably like "Fleur de saison" by Emilie Simon. Nonetheless, whether it's pop, rock or electronic, it's a really delightfully put together track loaded with hooks.

Past entries:
1999In Our Lifetime#100
39. Mr. Oizo - Flat Beat

One of my all time favourite UK #1 hits because how the heck did this even happen. OK once again we can use the whole music video thing because the song has a distinct image that isn't easy to forget, and it was also used in a Levis ad which of course allows pretty much anything, from old dad rock to remarkably mediocre grunge to get a UK #1 single. Still this is a little surprising for how little it provides in the way of convention. There's definitely a chorus, but there aren't many songs out there that use a monotone synth wobble as a primary hook.
38. Mandy Moore - Candy

I had this so perpetually linked with "Don't Say You Love Me" while I was doing this list that I was dreading the fact that I'd eventually have to rank one ahead of the other, which wasn't an easy decision at first. This song I definitely remember as a kid, just like I remembered Mandy Moore's name as a pop star even though she was in and out of the charts in the space of just 2 years. I don't actually really know why I remembered her because I couldn't tell you anything about her that stands out, just that I like a lot of her songs which really epitomise bubblegum pop to the point that this song is called "Candy". She does a good enough vocal performance to lift this song though, though it doesn't wait until the last chorus to do it, it does that Sugababes trick of really accentuating the chorus with the backing vocals in-between the main hook.
37. Moby - Honey

If there isn't a song called "Honey" in it, did your countdown really happen? I should disclose that I'm possibly cheating a little with this entry because it was released as a single in 1998, the year before "Play" came out but this is the album version and there's a slight difference in running length so I choose to believe that this album version can count in 1999. Anyway, if you know one thing about Moby's "Play" it's that the album was licenced to hell and back with more ad placements than an Imagine Dragons album. I am not entirely sure if I'm old enough to remember peak Moby saturation though I definitely remember a lot of the songs from being used in things, including this song, and there's probably some Stockholm syndrome in place because I'm certain I found this song annoying at one point. If I did though, it was probably a fascinated kind of irritation, like I found the conception of the song just so peculiar. It is after all, largely based on a constantly repeating sampled vocal loop, some time. In my opinion though, the real hook for this song is the shift towards the end of this loop. In one instance it's achieved just through the percussion playing a different note, in another there's a little string sample added. For such a simple song there's surprisingly a lot at play.
36. At The Drive-In - Catacomb

Speaking of cheating, I'm not sure conclusive evidence exists to confirm what year this song was actually released, I've seen conflicting evidence and the only concrete red truth (for the 0 of you who have read Umineko no Naku Koro ni) is that it was recorded in late 1999. I didn't properly look into this until I had already done my 2000 list so you could say that I am just including this in 1999 so I can include it at all, or perhaps we could say that it's here to distinguish itself from the version of this song that was released in 2000, titled "Catacombs". Anyway the point is that this song shreds. It does take a while to get there but once the real chorus of this song hits, it's one of the biggest belters I've ever heard from At The Drive-In.

Past entries:
2000One Armed Scissor#5
2000Invalid Litter Dept.#18
2000Arcarsenal#53
2000Pattern Against User#57
2000Non-Zero Possibility#73
2017Incurably Innocent#91
35. MF DOOM (feat DJ Cucumber Slice) - Rhymes Like Dimes

One of the most beloved songs from "Operation: Doomsday" because it's just so dang fun. DOOM's flow is pretty consistent here and is a perfect fit for the charming instrumental. DJ Cucumber Slice's outro probably goes just a little too long but it adds to the fun. I look forward to eventually reaching the first ever rap song to say '...you don't stop'. YEAAAAAAH, mashed potatos, apple sauce, buttery...biscuits.

Past entries (MF DOOM):
1999Doomsday (feat Pebbles The Invisible Girl)#89
2003Raid (as Madvillain) (feat MED)#37
2003America's Most Blunted (as Madvillain)#87
2004Accordian (as Madvillain)#45
2004All Caps (as Madvillain)#48
2004Rhinestone Cowboy (as Madvillain)#78
2004Curls (as Madvillain)#85
2004Figaro (as Madvillain)#91
2004Meat Grinder (as Madvillain)#97
2005Sofa King (as Dangerdoom)#47
2005Benzie Box (as Dangerdoom) (feat Cee-Lo)#50
2016Frankie Sinatra (with The Avalanches)#30
34. The Roots (feat DJ Jazzy Jeff & Jazzyfatnastees) - The Next Movement

"Boom! Shake The Room" is still quite a while away but this should suffice. I've never really been able to place exactly what it's reminding me of, but the chorus of this song I feel could totally pass for a Black Eyed Peas song. Suffice to say that it's one of the more radio friendly tracks on "Things Fall Apart".

Past entries (The Roots):
1999Adrenaline! (feat Dice Raw & Beanie Sigel)#42
1999The Spark#66
1999Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New (feat Dice Raw)#87
2002The Seed (2.0) (feat Cody ChesnuTT)#4
2006Don't Feel Right (feat Maimouna Youssef)#94
33. James - I Know What I'm Here For

I mentioned fake nostalgia earlier and this is what I've been leading up to. I had a miraculous sense of nostalgia when I queued this song up for this list the first time, as one of those occasional shocking re-discoveries of a song I must have heard a bunch when I was younger and completely forgot about until now. This being only a relatively minor hit for a band I've never really looked into made it easy to believe that it might be the case. It was not really the case, as I later discovered that the reason it was so profoundly familiar was that it was a song I'd heard when I was making my 2000 list and somehow missed it when I was sweeping the two lists for duplicates. But nonetheless, while the nostalgia might not have been real, the joy I got from the song very much was. I can see why this wasn't a huge hit or anything, as Britpop was in a bit of an awkward phase and I don't think anyone saw this as a signal for the future. Nonetheless, the super goofy instrumental hook is stellar.

Past entries:
2001Getting Away With It (All Messed Up)#41
32. Pavement - Major Leagues

This only really just clicked for me in time before getting the chance to being culled from my list. Pavement are of course a band with quite a strong reputation, to the point that every single one of their albums (at the time of writing this) is bolded on RYM...except for the one that this song is on. Nonetheless this song appears to be regularly cited as a highlight for their whole career. There's not a whole lot to the song either, but it's just a really relaxing and gentle track.

Past entries:
1999Carrot Rope#96
31. Dr. Dre (feat Snoop Dogg) - Still D.R.E.

By including this song in the list, I am of course representing for the gangstas all across the sentence that I cannot dignify finishing. Nonetheless it's a proven fact that Dre & Snoop are a winning combination and few come together as well as this track. STILL, what's most impressive to me is just how much variety there is in the production on this album yet it all feels so definitively D.R.E.

Past entries (Dr. Dre):
1999Forgot About Dre (feat Eminem)#58
1999What's The Difference (feat Eminem & Xzibit)#92
30. Garbage - The World Is Not Enough

Another one in the ever-growing pile of Garbage tracks that had me utterly captivated on just my first listen. Once again the video comes into play with its simple but effective concept that fits well with the fact that it's a Bond theme. It all distracted me from the fact that this is a fair bit different for Garbage given how much the strings dominate the track over the guitar. I also can't help but feel slightly suspicious that the only reason Garbage have done a Bond theme is so that people can make Shirley Manson/Bassey comparisons, which of course people did.

Past entries:
2001Cherry Lips (Go Baby Go!)#15
2001Androgyny#33
2005Why Do You Love Me#87
2016So We Can Stay Alive#31
29. The Dismemberment Plan - What Do You Want Me To Say?

This song didn't really connect me on my first listen through and I removed it from my list. I then listened to this whole album and put it back in my list and now it's ended up quite high here. It might be the most conventional song on this album, not just because the title is very prominent in the hook but the fact that the hook is very digestible. It's a good contrast alongside the verses though, which thanks to a prevalent guitar riff has a very tense feeling.

Past entries:
1999A Life Of Possibilities#49
19998 1/2 Minutes#68
1999Gyroscope#80
28. Fatman Scoop (feat The Crooklyn Clan) - Be Faithful

From what I can understand, this song was a club hit way back in 1999 and didn't get a proper widespread release for years, which I assume is because of legal issues with sampling (which I'm certain I'll not talk about later in this list). If you weren't aware of that, this might be an incredibly jarring song to see in this list. Not that it isn't incredibly jarring as a pop entity because gosh this is a peculiar song. One where you just have to decide not to question anything and accept it for what it was. I can't imagine whose idea it was to make this song have that random interlude but then I can't imagine the song without it, largely because it transitions back into the main song so forcefully, and so wonderfully. Fatman Scoop puts so much into his performance that I don't even mind the fact that I have to listen to a largely censored version of it, because all the intent still comes through.
27. Emilíana Torrini - To Be Free

Most of Emilíana's entries here have been on the chill side of things which is fine of course, but I think this was the song that stood out the most for me. Even before the guitars come roaring in on the chorus, the song has a certain sinister vibe to it. It's definitely banking on that pay off though, you can tell by how the percussion keeps faking it out by stuttering at the end of lines.

Past entries:
1999Easy#50
1999Unemployed In Summertime#64
1999Baby Blue#70
1999Dead Things#73
2009Me and Armini (Dan Carey Mix)#47
26. MF DOOM (feat King Geedorah) - Red and Gold

This was an instant highlight for me because of the marvellous production. It has a sort of evocative & chill vibe that makes me think of Flume. It also hits surprisingly hard with the drums, but it's a good fit for one of DOOM's more forceful flows.

Past entries (MF DOOM):
1999Rhymes Like Dimes (feat DJ Cucumber Slice)#35
1999Doomsday (feat Pebbles The Invisible Girl)#89
2003Raid (as Madvillain) (feat MED)#37
2003America's Most Blunted (as Madvillain)#87
2004Accordion (as Madvillain)#45
2004All Caps (as Madvillain)#48
2004Rhinestone Cowboy (as Madvillain)#78
2004Curls (as Madvillain)#85
2004Figaro (as Madvillain)#91
2004Meat Grinder (as Madvillain)#97
2005Sofa King (as Dangerdoom)#47
2005Benzie Box (as Dangerdoom) (feat Cee-Lo)#50
2016Frankie Sinatra (with The Avalanches)#30
25. Dream Theater - Home [Scene Six]

I think I was lucky to come across this one because I must have collated my list shortly before this was deleted from RYM's singles database. It's kind of funny that I found it there because despite some highly rated albums, I see almost nothing but hate for this band and their cheesy, over-the-top prog rock. There's no other way to describe this song though, which probably isn't going to change anybody's minds about the genre. For such a long song though, there's surprisingly a good deal going on with just how many different sections there are. There's no way you can justify saying that it's not indulgent but it's just so fulfilling.
24. Sigur Rós - Svefn-G-Englar

Sigur Rós couldn't have known when they made this song that iTunes and most digital outlets automatically make 10+ minute songs album only, and because of that and this song which is 10 minutes and 4 seconds long, I own this whole album. I'm totally content with that because the album is very good, and it's hard to ignore this song which for many is the peak of the band's career. It's a very beautiful track with just enough going on in terms of background feedback. The hook in particular is just so pretty.

Past entries:
1999Ágætis Byrjun#83
2002Untitled #7 (Dauðalagið)#50
2002Untitled #1 (Vaka)#55
2005Hoppípolla#28
2007Hljómalind#98
2008Gobbledigook#62
2008Inní Mér Syngur Vitleysingur#98
23. Filter - Welcome To The Fold

You've heard "Take A Picture" and you want more. After the 30 second intro, this is the first track you're treated to and it's an instant shock to the system. Even when I went into it expecting something a bit different it still took me by surprise. Not that it's super aggressive but it does start off pretty loud with the softer chorus taking a minute to arrive. The line 'get yourself an ice cold beer' sounds incredibly out of place but nonetheless it's an absolute belter through and through.

Past entries:
1999The Best Things#67
22. Dido - Here With Me

Dido has a bit of an unjustified reputation for being as plain as a certain blue haired cosplayer, which probably comes from her immense success in the early 2000s and remarkably white bread image. It was prevalent enough that I struggled to take her seriously myself, even when I later learned that she did in fact take more diverse ventures with her music. Oddly enough it was a song that I was already very familiar with that won me over. I don't have a WorkSafe joke to make because I grew up in the wrong states, but going back to "Here With Me" many years later had me shocked at just how thrilling it was. As a way to bridge her career from Faithless, this is a really good move to make as it gives the best of both worlds in a pretty seamless package.

Past entries:
2000Stan (with Eminem)#10
21. Mos Def - Ms. Fat Booty

If you can get past the ridiculous title, it's easy to see why this is Mos Def's most popular song. It's one of the best sample loops ever for one, with samples taken from Aretha Franklin's "One Step Ahead". It reminds me a little bit of Jay-Z & Kanye West's "Otis" with just how jarring the sample is at first, and how it doesn't really end in a comfortable way. It's just so effortlessly fun.

Past entries:
1999Mathematics#45
1999Speed Law#57
1999UMI Says#76
2004Two Words (with Kanye West)#72
2010Stylo (with Gorillaz)#63
20. The Dismemberment Plan - Memory Machine

This song is all about the complicated countering necessity of grief and happiness in our lives. The song starts off with the notion that immortality would be a great prospect if not for the eternal mental anguish it brings along with it, but then admitting that even in normal life, he's already had enough of that. But who knows, maybe some day they'll make a machine to expunge all the misery from our lives. Outside of that, it's one of the punchiest songs on the album, I love both the aggressive drum loop and the cathartic chorus hook...which actually fits the theme of the lyrics.

Past entries:
1999What Do You Want Me To Say?#29
1999A Life Of Possibilities#49
19998 1/2 Minutes#68
1999Gyroscope#80
19. Pharoahe Monch - Simon Says

I don't know if this song is super well known but it did make the top 10 on loggy one week for reasons unknown. It's especially difficult to gauge its popularity because it's no longer on iTunes or Spotify, as it's subject to eternal legal trouble since it includes a prominent Godzilla sample which wasn't cleared. The entire album is out of print because of it. It's also a tough position because I can't imagine the song without that sample. It's just such an addictively forceful song, and I find myself highly amused by the notion that all commands upon the audience in music need a 'Simon says' at the front to make it official. A bit like the 'sudo make me a sandwich' xkcd comic.
18. Something For Kate - Hallways

I always feel like nobody rides for this song the same way I do because it's so unassuming but maybe I'm wrong about that. It's also a peculiar song because it only really has 1 verse. Once the first chorus hits it never returns to the original state. Even the chorus doesn't stay the same way each time, adding more and more to it. That's entertainment.

Past entries:
1999Whatever You Want#65
1999Electricity#69
2001Monsters#4
2001Jerry, Stand Up#31
2001Say Something#47
2001Stunt Show#71
2001Happy Endings#83
2001Three Dimensions#94
2003Déjà-vu#13
2003Kaplan/Thornhill#78
2006Cigarettes and Suitcases#22
2006California#43
2012Survival Expert#47
17. Rage Against The Machine - Guerrilla Radio

It is not a wild revelation to say that I played a lot of Tony Hawk Pro Skater 2 in my youth. An extremely censored version of this song is featured on it and through that it's probably the one Rage song I've heard more than any other. Since the credits never showed up on screen during the game though, I never even knew it was by them, which is interesting because I spent a good amount of the 2000s continually encountering the band without making the connection. This year also featured "Spray Water On The Stereo", "Pumping On Your Stereo" and "Turn Up Your Stereo" in the Hottest 100 so it was a very big year on the radio for...the radio. It also featured a song called "Turn That Shit Up" so really this song just had to exist to sum it all up. What a marvellous riff though, it's not as technically impressive as say, "Bulls On Parade", but it never fails to amp me up.

Past entries:
1999Sleep Now In The Fire#55
2000Renegades of Funk#67
16. Moby - Porcelain

This definitely goes under the category of Moby songs I've known for longer than I can remember. "Body Rock" is another one which was close to making this list, and shout out to "Natural Blues" because there are so many hits to be had there. This song has always felt special to me though. It could be entirely instrumental and I really wouldn't mind, the gentle piano and humming synth already compliment each other so well. This year A$AP Rocky dedicated an entire song to sampling this, and meanwhile Travis Scott confined to one line with a dodgy Moby/Moby Dick pun, further proving however that meme goes about him living up to the legacy that was meant for Rocky.

Past entries:
1999Honey#37
15. Nine Inch Nails - We're In This Together

I made the observation a few weeks back that this song had a lot in common with "We Should Be Together Now" by Powderfinger, at the very least you can sing the chorus of one to the other because they're pretty much the same tune. Powderfinger just slotted the 'Now' into the title to avoid suspicion. This song comes from "The Fragile", which despite being released at the height of their fame, is one of the most indulgent Nine Inch Nails albums running close to 2 hours long, because the '90s were a mistake. "Starf**kers Inc." is of course the big single from the album but I've found the production hasn't aged especially well. Fortunately this song scratches the right itch in its place. The chorus just comes roaring in with so much force that it's hard not to love.
14. Slipknot - Wait and Bleed

There is of course a more radio friendly version of this song that helped it become a genuine hit by removing the unclean vocals. I'm not having any of that, the song needs all the aggression it can get. There are clean vocals of course, and while I'm often not okay with it, they do pretty well here to give a sing-along hook.

Past entries:
1999Surfacing#44
13. Destiny's Child - Bills, Bills, Bills

I feel like this is an unpopular opinion but it's not easy to tell because poptimism 20 years ago wasn't anything near what it now, so any possible revisionism is blocked out by decades of 'argh this isn't guitar music'. It is of course a popular song, it gave Destiny's Child their first US #1 hit, and this was their highest selling album, despite not being made by their signature line up. Admittedly the song is very trapped in its time with the production quirks that would not exist in any other time line, but the core song itself is so captivating and strong to make up for it. I continue to be an absolute sucker for all those vocal runs in the chorus.
12. Beck - Sexxlaws

This has always been one of my favourite Beck songs and it probably has a lot to do with the fact that it's one of the more prominently used songs on the episode of Futurama he appears on. If nothing else, it's quite a welcome change of pace from his often very dour output. It also takes the same lesson as another certain 1999 song in that horns are a great way to show triumph, and make the song sound tremendous on a sunny day.

Past entries:
2002Lonesome Tears#1
2002Sunday Sun#22
2002Paper Tiger#63
2005Girl#99
11. Dr. Dre (feat Snoop Dogg, Kurupt & Nate Dogg) - The Next Episode

This borders on being a comedic beat more than it is a song, but as a quick package there's not much better. There's a constant prevailing argument that coarse language is rarely needed and is often just an entry barrier for certain musical artists. The counter to this is that there are few f-bombs as potent as the one that introduces Dr. Dre's verse here. Not since "Check The Rhime" has mutual kinship in verses felt so potent. Inclusion of this song also means that this list is more in sync with "2002" than "1999" which is...peculiar.

Past entries (Dr. Dre):
1999Still D.R.E. (feat Snoop Dogg)#31
1999Forgot About Dre (feat Eminem)#58
1999What's The Difference (feat Eminem & Xzibit)#92

Past entries (Snoop Dogg):
1999Still D.R.E. (with Dr. Dre)#31
10. Sonic Animation - Theophilus Thistler (An Exercise In Vowels)

I must admit that it's a surprise for me to see this in the top 10 and I didn't realise I liked it quite this much. Certainly though it's a song that has fascinated me for many, many years. It's all about those tongue twisters making it remarkably difficult to sing along even if you know all the words. The drum loop is what really sells it though, you're always waiting for it to come back around again.
9. Jebediah - Animal

Also a slight bit of a surprise in the top 10 but it is the highest Australian entry here so well done. There's a decent handful of Jebediah songs I've always had a strong inclination to and this might be the biggest one, despite being far from the first few I'd heard. It's hard to properly justify it though since there's nothing particularly unique about this, just that it has one of their most explosive choruses. I'd be fascinated to know just how jarring this sounds to people who aren't used to the band because Kevin's voice is so ridiculously soaked in his accent and it's impossible to ignore that certain texture, that certain sneer.
8. Sigur Rós - Hjartað Hamast

Plot twist if you thought that we were done with this band. Ranking excessively long post-rock songs is not the easiest of tasks so there's always a certain anxiety in the back of my head that I've made a horrible mistake, especially when it goes a bit against the grain. However, no other Sigur Rós song for me can quite match the high of this song when the chorus hits. The piano that plays towards the end also sounds suspiciously like the intro to "Lose Yourself" so if there's some vomit mixed in with the chills, that might explain it.

Past entries:
1999Svefn-G-Englar#24
1999Ágætis Byrjun#83
2002Untitled #7 (Dauðalagið)#50
2002Untitled #1 (Vaka)#55
2005Hoppípolla#28
2007Hljómalind#98
2008Gobbledigook#62
2008Inní Mér Syngur Vitleysingur#98
7. Muse - Showbiz

This song feels out of place on the album which it bears the title of. It's just not really the sort of song structure that Muse were writing then, or really ever. I've joked before about songs with only one verse but it often feels like this song just doesn't have verses at all because the mighty crescendo defeats the point of there being any real cooldown period. This song is Matt Bellamy at his most ridiculous, to the point that at the end, it's not exactly clear if you're hearing his voice or guitar feedback, it just blurs together. It's all just such a tremendous build up that it's always been a massive favourite in Muse's hefty catalogue.

Past entries:
1999Uno#47
1999Sunburn#63
2001Plug In Baby#2
2001Citizen Erased#11
2001New Born#14
2001Bliss#20
2001Futurism#57
2001Space Dementia#67
2001Hyper Music#91
2002Dead Star#19
2003Stockholm Syndrome#3
2003Hysteria#7
2003Sing For Absolution#10
2003Butterflies and Hurricanes#22
2003The Small Print#29
2003Fury#53
2003Thoughts Of A Dying Atheist#55
2003Time Is Running Out#62
2003Eternally Missed#74
2003Falling Away With You#85
2003Apocalypse Please#90
2006Knights Of Cydonia#5
2006Glorious#20
2006Assassin (Grand Omega Bosses Edit)#31
2006Starlight#38
2006Invincible#52
2009Unnatural Selection#13
2009Uprising#29
2009MK Ultra#53
2009Resistance#68
2010Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever)#75
2012Panic Station#67
2012Explorers#75
2015Reapers#86
6. Foo Fighters - Generator

It surprises me a little just how few entries Foo Fighters have picked up over the years on this list but I suppose they do play it safe a little too often. Part of me wonders if I'd see "Generator" as just another so-so Foo Fighters song if not for the iconic talk box solo. Certainly it's nothing spectacular lyrically, particularly if you look past all the thematic words. Nonetheless, it's still a song I never get tired of hearing, which is perhaps helped by the fact that it's not nearly as overplayed as it could be, perhaps owing to the fact that it was only really a hit in Australia.

Past entries:
1999Stacked Actors#81
2002All My Life#24
2002Low#89
2005No Way Back#66
2007The Pretender#41
2011Bridge Burning#28
2011Rope#40
5. Ben Folds Five - Army

I am exceedingly looking forward to digging into the first two Ben Folds Five albums because I suspect I'll enjoy them a lot, as the band have often been a blind spot outside of the big singles for me. The popularity of a certain song in their discography distracts just a little from what they're more commonly like, which at times ended up being a good thing because I got just a little surprise every time I heard a different Ben Folds Five song and was surprised at just how much fun I was having. "Army" is certainly one of those cases. In typical Ben Folds Five fashion, it's a pretty humourous song; the opening lyric is extremely jarring at first for how direct it is. Even if not everything turns out right, the song is always there to be infectiously upbeat. As I hinted at about 7 songs ago, those goddamn horns.
4. Blur - Coffee & TV

I don't like Blur's album "13" as much as I would like which is a shame, but maybe one day I'll go back to it and it'll all click. At the very least I can always rely on the singles for a good time. "Coffee & TV" has been a big favourite of mine ever since I saw the music video which I love to this day. For the most part, it's a relatively straight forward song that skirts the line on being bland, but it's the right amount of chill for me. Not to mention there's that great guitar solo always waiting around the corner.

Past entries:
1999Tender#82
2010Fool's Day#60
3. Muse - Muscle Museum

Something I have now finished doing since I've gotten through all these years is replacing all my ill-gotten Muse albums and buying them with actual money. I regret all the illegal downloading I did but alas I was a high schooler without income and it was the norm. The main reason I mention this here is because for a very long time, "Muscle Museum" was one of my most played songs despite the fact that I didn't even have the full version of it. I had a weird edited version that shortens the intro, and notably cuts out a passage before the first chorus. That even gets played on the radio so it was always so jarring whenever I heard the proper song. Despite the set back, it was always a big favourite from Muse thanks to the the distinct guitar riff at the start and the massive hook. The comment I made about "Showbiz" also applies here, those high notes at the end of the song, holy shit.

Past entries:
1999Showbiz#7
1999Uno#47
1999Sunburn#63
2001Plug In Baby#2
2001Citizen Erased#11
2001New Born#14
2001Bliss#20
2001Futurism#57
2001Space Dementia#67
2001Hyper Music#91
2002Dead Star#19
2003Stockholm Syndrome#3
2003Hysteria#7
2003Sing For Absolution#10
2003Butterflies and Hurricanes#22
2003The Small Print#29
2003Fury#53
2003Thoughts Of A Dying Atheist#55
2003Time Is Running Out#62
2003Eternally Missed#74
2003Falling Away With You#85
2003Apocalypse Please#90
2006Knights Of Cydonia#5
2006Glorious#20
2006Assassin (Grand Omega Bosses Edit)#31
2006Starlight#38
2006Invincible#52
2009Unnatural Selection#13
2009Uprising#29
2009MK Ultra#53
2009Resistance#68
2010Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever)#75
2012Panic Station#67
2012Explorers#75
2015Reapers#86
2. The Roots (feat Erykah Badu) - You Got Me

I have a memory of being in a restaurant and while they weren't playing Neutral Milk Hotel, they were playing a certain hip hop song that I really took a liking to, however I couldn't hear it clear enough to make out any lyrics (I'm pretty sure I didn't have Shazam at the time because otherwise this story doesn't chronologically match up to my thing with "I Might Survive" by Architecture In Helsinki) which as you can imagine is a frustrating thing to happen. I still don't know what that song was but I could imagine it being this one because it was certainly the sort of chill thing that wouldn't sound out of place dining, and this is as chill as it gets. As a curiosity, while for both artists this is just slightly not their most popular song on Spotify, I was surprised to discover that Erykah Badu actually has slightly more monthly listeners than The Roots. I know she's popular in her own right but it's just not how it usually turns out. She's certainly an essential piece of this song though as a response to Black Thought's verses. As a song of mutual trust, it feels like the blueprint to Ja Rule's entire career. It's just two people who would give their world, to lift each other up, and change their life to better suit each other's mood. I can get why people might think this song is a bit boring but it just hits that sweet spot for me, and also I have to shout out ?uestlove's breakbeat outro because that's a great way of adding to the song while not distracting too much.

Congrats to The Roots, The Dismemberment Plan & Emiliana Torrini with the most entries in this new column https://imgur.com/a/WT1En2u

Past entries (The Roots):
1999The Next Movement (feat DJ Jazzy Jeff & Jazzyfatnastees)#34
1999Adrenaline! (feat Dice Raw & Beanie Sigel)#42
1999The Spark#66
1999Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New (feat Dice Raw)#87
2002The Seed (2.0) (feat Cody ChesnuTT)#4
2006Don't Feel Right (feat Maimouna Youssef)#94

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1. XTC - Easter Theatre

I like "Smooth" but it did not make this list. So yeah, when I said that I bought XTC's 1999 album because it wasn't on Spotify, that was true, but it was primarily because of this one song which almost singlehandedly paid the price of admission. I only first heard this song this year, because I saw how great its reputation was and felt that given my history with XTC, it would be costly to overlook this song just because it wasn't on Spotify. So I listened to it and I was blown away. This song pretty much perfectly encapsulates XTC's Beatles throwback vibe, to the point that most comments I see about the song are basically saying that it would be an eternal classic like a "Strawberry Fields Forever" or "Eleanor Rigby" but isn't because it was an XTC song in the late '90s so hardly anyone heard it. Even in the UK, where every boomer act was a perpetual force right up until the death of the CD Single, the charts were done with XTC long before this came out. This song just has a ceaseless joy of it and it's everything I love in music. Andy Partridge is a musical genius.

Past entries:
1999Harvest Festival#71
Nice! I have been listening to Skylarking recently so will dig out Apple Venus as well for another listen.

Dismemberment Plan has been on my "need to check out" list for a while but never have.

Other excessively long post-rock songs that were great from 1999 were Moya by Godspeed You! Black Emporer and Christmas Steps by Mogwai!
Yeah I quite liked Moya, it was on my very, very big playlist of songs I listened to, to make this list.
Nice list! And great to see XTC get some recognition. And there's still 20 years of their back catalogue to go.

The Sigur Ros album is actually called Ágætis Byrjun, and it's still their best IMO.

I think Electricity was Something For Kate's first single with Stephanie Ashworth on guitar, but they had released some singles in 1996-97 without her.
Yo I'm doing this thing again for 1998. It'll probably be around 4pm AEST on Sunday...until someone points out that I fudged that time up and need to adjust it. It'll be whenever this thread turns up at the top of the list again ~
'98-96 are my favorite years ever so i'm hoping for a wide variety here, don't disappoint
Looking forward to your take on '98
1998

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII LOOOOOOOOOOOVEEEEEE YOOOOOOOUUUUU 1998

Most of you may know me for being notoriously 2-3 hours behind you on account of living in Western Australia, where I was also born. In reality though, I spent pretty much all my schooling years in South Australia, and have far more built in sentimentality towards that locale than any of the many suburbs around WA I've been in. 1998 was the year I moved there. For my first term, possibly even too longer, I was too scared to go to the playground during recess & lunch so I just sat outside of the classroom, I was missing out big time sadly. It was also the year that it became apparent that I was the maths kid, showing remarkable interest and speedy proficiency to the point that my teacher was frequently running out of workbooks to give me. I also successfully invited my teacher to my birthday party and I know of no one else who had done such a thing, nor can I understand the reasoning behind me doing it. It's also kind of surprising that when I came to my new school, I was effectively given two friends to hang out with (I am not sure if they volunteered or not) one of which I would still consider a relatively (compared to pretty much anyone else I went to school with) close friend...and the other I'm at least still friends with on Facebook, we stopped really hanging out together after a couple of years, different friendship groups essentially. The only other noteworthy anecdote I can think of is that before I moved, I did stay at my old school long enough to get to do Sports Day. I was actually seemingly fit and able at the time! Everything was a race between 4 people with a medal for all 4 placings because I'm a millennial, and I got 1 of everything + an extra 3rd. My 4th place came in the 50m sprint because I was winning at the start but then heard my parents cheering me on so I stopped to turn around. I could not catch up in time once I realised this was a bad move.

How about that music though? I was not remotely old enough to vote in triple j's Hottest 100 but if I had, I would absolutely have voted for The Offspring's "Pretty Fly (For A White Guy)", absolutely my favourite song ever until "The Bad Touch" came out a year later. Now that I know a bit more music, I'm pretty confident in saying that 1998 is absolutely stepping over the line. I could probably make a list of 100 more songs that didn't get in here that I still love. There's stuff I've been anticipating reaching for this so I could finally give them a proper appraisal and they haven't made this list. What we do have here is I feel by my standards a relatively eclectic list.

chats: https://us21.chatzy.com/61009173008961
tunes: http://myradiostream.com/station/flashplayer.php?s=s6&p=14748
100. Gloria Estefan - Heaven's What I Feel

There were a lot of oddities I uncovered to my liking in this process that I kept on my playlist not expecting them to make the final cut. What inevitably happened with this is that I spent more time getting attached to those songs to the point that I couldn't cut them. Anyway it's a 1998 list and Gloria Estefan is on it. This was actually her last Billboard top 40 hit (and apparently an Australian hit according to a very dubious Wikipedia table). I don't know how it was remotely fitting it for the landscape of 1998, but it does make for an uplifting tune with a hint of melancholy.

99. Spoon - The Agony Of Laffitte

I want to believe that this is the only annual music list that contains both Gloria Estefan and Spoon. This is a serving of surprising relevance except on the other side of the spectrum to me. Nonetheless, even in 1998, Spoon still sound like Spoon. The hook moderately amuses me because it cuts off the previous line, and tricks you into thinking he's saying 'no better' but it's actually 'know better'.

Past entries:
2002The Way We Get By#84
2002Someone Something#94
2007The Underdog#20
2007My Little Japanese Cigarette Case#46
2010The Mystery Zone#45
2017Can I Sit Next To You#47

98. Tori Amos - Spark

I totally forgot that Tori Amos was in my last list just because I've been too busy to actually listen back to a lot of it. "Spark" is a curiosity for a different reason of forgetfulness, because I tend to be reasonably good at remembering the hit stock of artists I know well. Okay I can't remember anything but I'd recognise it if I looked it up. My point is that I didn't realise "Spark" was a top 50 hit here until about a week or so ago. It strikes me as a bit unexpected and I assume is more about it being a lead single and the song being very much in her recognised wheelhouse.

Past entries:
1999Bliss#75

97. Gerling - Enter Spacecapsule (Radio Disko Remix)

I'm obviously just here for the redemption story. If you remember too many years ago when I made that stupidly large Hottest 100 rank, I put "Enter Spacecapsule" very, very low on the list. That was entirely because I didn't know the reality of the single. While there is a precedent for ambience in the Hottest 100 (just ask a certain drum & bass group), Gerling's breakout single was a step too far for me. Of course now I know that the real reason it was so popular is because this remix existed and turned it into a proper party, bearing about as much similarity to the original as a Murder Remix. As a side note, I would not be surprised if this remix didn't actually exist until 1999 but I swore by a discogs listing of Gerling's album which had the remix tacked on and still said it was from 1998. Sometimes you kind of have to give up on beliving it's possible to make these lists accurate.

96. Miss Kittin & The Hacker - 1982

I'm going to look a bit hypocritical in my critical ways right here. Primarily because I have been very critical in the realm of late '90s dance hits relying too heavily on simple synth riffs. So with that in mind it'll look like I'm just making shit up to fit my worldview without admitting that I'm wrong, but I do think that this song which I primarily remember for the instrumental hook has enough back end behind that to balance it out. And of course rather than sounding cheap and cheerful, it sounds borderline evil. The lyrics also serve as a fascinating probe of potential spoilers should I ever progress another 16 years with this.

95. Lauryn Hill - I Used To Love Him

I wanted to put more tracks in from this album but it got really tough in terms of making cuts all around. "Lost Ones" is the hypothetical #101 and probably one of the best showcases of her rapping on the album. This is a totally different side of things, but that versatility is what made her so popular I suppose. "The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill" dips a bit in the latter half (and suffers from being too long like most late '90s albums), but tracks like this make the ride a little more smooth.

94. Madonna - Drowned World / Substitute For Love

I am not at all prepared to make blanket statements about Madonna's catalogue as on the album side of things my knowledge is not at all up to scratch. I am told by many of those whose is, that "Ray Of Light" is something of a creative peak and I can totally believe it. William Orbit's lush style of production breathes so much life into everything, and makes these tracks hold up amazingly 20 years later. Even the song itself is interesting in how you hit the 3 minute mark and Madonna goes sicko mode, changing up the track completely.

93. Elliott Smith - Baby Britain

This song could probably be higher but I can't decide if 'for someone half as smart, you'd be a work of art' is a clever enough lyric to offset how insufferably smug it is. Criticising Elliott Smith for that seems like a bit of a moot point though. If you can get past that, and you often find him too dreary, then this may be for you because it's a delightfully upbeat track with uplifting piano.

Past entries:
2000Son Of Sam#41
2004Memory Lane#49

92. Joydrop - Beautiful

I discovered that this band were Canadian on the night that the QLVG list locked in with 100 entries. Not that I know anyone to reciprocate me on it, but it's fun to acknowledge these things. I find that the song itself is a close cousin to Scarling. with its soft/angry dynamic. The hook could almost be considered a jump scare. It's another song that I thought wouldn't make the cut at first.

91. Saint Etienne - The Bad Photographer

Saint Etienne to me have always been a smart, sophisticated pop group only ever on the fringe of popularity. I first heard of them when Popular blogged about their song called... "Popular", but didn't really hear their music until I started making these lists. To their credit they had a decent strike rate in that I've never dumped one of their tracks after a single listen, but they have never made my proper list until now. And yeah, it's a really fun, upbeat track that reminds me of Belle and Sebastian.
90. Dario G - Carnaval de Paris

1998 was clearly a bumper year for football related music. Though I might not have thought so when I wrote my review, I've gained a begrudging respect for "Three Lions '98" on its own merits, and of course "Vindaloo" is a wonderful bit of UK nationalism to in the name of an Indian food dish, with a video parodying The Verve's parody of Massive Attack's video. But it's still a bit weird for me to listen to songs written for a sport I only have a passing interest in, and for a team I have no investment in that isn't tied to watching how those songs subsequently perform in the charts. "Carnavl de Paris" does not have this problem because it's an instrumental and relatively easy to remove from the context. It's just a ridiculous blast of fun energy because they don't just meander on the melody. Every brief moment of the song is a wild exploration of what instrument they'll chuck into the mix next.

89. OutKast (feat Raekwon) - Skew It On The Bar-B

I've been listening to every OutKast album as I reach them for this and I've finally reached totally unexplored territory with "Aquemini". I can definitely hear in in how they were on the fringe of mass popularity, just yet to find that big hit which would take them there. Maybe the chorus of this song is just too Australian for it to catch on. I do find it an amusing contrast to the fact that Andre 3000 does manage to fit the word 'bourgeoise' into his verse.

Past entries (OutKast):
2000B.O.B.#6
2000Ms. Jackson#19
2000So Fresh, So Clean#82
2001The Whole World (feat Killer Mike)#23
2003Hey Ya!#37
2003Prototype#59
2003GhettoMusick#83

Past entries (Raekwon):
1999Apollo Kids (with Ghostface Killah)#84

88. Massive Attack - Group Four

I'm pretty sure I listened to "Mezzanine" years ago and didn't get a whole lot out of it, but when I came back to it this year everything just clicked with me. It just constantly succeeds in its vibe and occasionally gets surprisingly creative at times. It's also easy to see how it appealed so well to the rock crowd because when they bring the guitars out they really get going with it. The outro of this rather lengthy track is one of the best examples of this, but prior to that it's also really engaging in a more chill way.

Past entries:
2010Paradise Circus (feat Hope Sandoval)#91
2016The Spoils (feat Hope Sandoval)#39

87. Five - When The Lights Go Out

It wouldn't be right if I never had a Five song in one of these lists. Sanctioned by my age, ever since I've known which songs were theirs, they've been possibly my favourite boy band, possibly helped by their hit repertoire being very lacking in the ballads that plague every discography. Instead they have fun songs like this. There's a good punch to the production being bolstered by the percussion, and with no member seeming to try to go for the starring role, different members get to take turns on the chorus.

86. R.E.M. - Parakeet

This is clearly R.E.M. pandering to Australian audiences because they mention Brisbane in the lyrics. "Daysleeper" is probably the obvious choice from this album, but I found myself really drawn into the less familiar melancholy of this track. Possibly not the best song of 1998 to include the lyric 'baby, baby' in the chorus.

Past entries:
1999The Great Beyond#53
2001Imitation Of Life#76

85. Alisha's Attic - The Incidentals

On the topic I've mentioned before, I really expected this to finish off at around #120, but whenever I wasn't working on this list, this was the song that kept getting stuck in my head. There's also a certain amusing factor of Alisha's Attic becoming a two hit wonder in this list, but not with either of the two hits they're actually known with (I can't recall either of them right now but they haven't clicked with me...yet). If "Pretender Got My Heart" was a little on the spooky side, this is just pure sunshine.

Past entries:
2001Pretender Got My Heart#50

84. System Of A Down - P.L.U.C.K.

While System Of A Down have soundtracked a lot of my life, one exception aside, I have really not been exposed to their first album until now. I had no idea what to expect and if it would hold up without any familiarity and nostalgia. To that degree I can report that it is very much in the same wheelhouse as "Toxicity" and is extremely in my lane. I personally enjoy clicking at random points of this song on the progress bar and seeing if I just so happen to click on an instance that Serj is screaming an extended syllable. It's surprisingly more common than you'd think.

Past entries:
2001Chop Suey!#6
2001Forest#13
2001Toxicity#22
2001Aerials#26
2001Jet Pilot#32
2001Deer Dance#59
2001Bounce#61
2001Prison Song#70
2001Shimmy#73
2001Needles#82
2001Psycho#86
2001Science#95
2002Innervision#56
2005Kill Rock 'n' Roll#5
2005Hypnotize#13
2005Radio/Video#24
2005B.Y.O.B.#30
2005Revenga#32

83. Neutral Milk Hotel - In the Aeroplane Over the Sea

Depending on how you have experienced music and music-related discourse, Neutral Milk Hotel's "In The Aeroplane Over The Sea" is the most over-exposed and over-discussed album of all time...or you've never heard it and have no idea what it even sounds like. Or both really I suppose. Anyway the least surprising thing in the world is that I love it and have for pretty much this entire decade since discovering it. The title track is on the more conventional side of things with less wild exaggerated vocal moments, and a relatively normal waltzing rhythm.

82. The Roots (feat Dice Raw) - Don't See Us

I thought I was done with this Roots album last year but then I found out that there was another single from the album that got released in the year before. It must not have jumped out for me when I listened to the album either but I suppose something like this can be expected when so much of this is running on early impressions. Maybe it just didn't stand out next to a bunch of Roots songs but compared to 1998 music in general it sounded more fresh again.

Past entries (The Roots):
1999You Got Me (feat Erykah Badu)#2
1999The Next Movement (feat DJ Jazzy Jeff & Jazzyfatnastees)#34
1999Adrenaline! (feat Dice Raw & Beanie Sigel)#42
1999The Spark#66
1999Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New (feat Dice Raw)#87
2002The Seed (2.0) (feat Cody ChesnuTT)#4
2006Don't Feel Right (feat Maimouna Youssef)#94

Past entries (Dice Raw):
1999Adrenaline! (with The Roots)#42
1999Ain't Sayin' Nothin' New (with The Roots)#87

81. They Might Be Giants - Doctor Worm

It is entirely possible that this song has made the cut purely for the amazing payoff in the lyric where he admits with gleeful optimism that he hopes someone else will call him by his stage name. But why stop there when the song is just filled with those endless one liners. He's not a real doctor but he is a real worm, he thinks he's getting pretty good but he can handle criticism. I remember finding this a weird entity in the Hottest 100 history as not a They Might Be Giants song I was familiar with, and yet it was *so* high up on the list. Absolute party though, what a time to be alive in a world where this song exists.
80. System Of A Down - Peephole

This track gives me immediate thoughts of some of the goofier tracks in their later discography, like "Radio/Video" which had its borderline polka moments. It's only very brief but it's the thing that sticks out the most to me. Aside from that you get a good chunk of chugging riffs and fun riffery.

Past entries:
1998P.L.U.C.K.#84
2001Chop Suey!#6
2001Forest#13
2001Toxicity#22
2001Aerials#26
2001Jet Pilot#32
2001Deer Dance#59
2001Bounce#61
2001Prison Song#70
2001Shimmy#73
2001Needles#82
2001Psycho#86
2001Science#95
2002Innervision#56
2005Kill Rock 'n' Roll#5
2005Hypnotize#13
2005Radio/Video#24
2005B.Y.O.B.#30
2005Revenga#32

79. Fatboy Slim - Right Here, Right Now

I've come a long way, baby, and now I've reached Fatboy Slim's iconic album. My exposure to this track as a soundbed in soundtracks means that it took a while for me to realise it was a proper song. Such is Fatboy Slim's unconventional tendencies. Nonetheless the strings in this track do a lot to make for a dramatic listen, but the breakdowns arrive on time to keep it exciting.

78. Garbage - Temptation Waits

I have to admit I expected a bit more Garbage in this list before I made it just because I had some really strong early impressions on some album tracks and there were already stacks of singles alongside it. "When I Grow Up" was one of the last songs I cut for this list also, losing out to a song I'm not sure I'd heard before doing this. But then maybe being fresh helps in its own way.

Past entries:
1999The World Is Not Enough#30
2001Cherry Lips (Go Baby Go!)#15
2001Androgyny#33
2005Why Do You Love Me#87
2016So We Can Stay Alive#31

77. Manic Street Preachers - The Everlasting

I have been largely avoiding discourse around me relating to this Manics album with its very noteworthy single that gave the band their first of two UK #1 hits. As much as I love that even in the late '90s, there was a song calling out a certain bigoted social movement, I feel the song musically doesn't quite get off the ground enough for me. This song probably doesn't sound much different now that I think about it but there's a bit more momentum with the melody, while also retaining the arpeggio on the guitar to similar effect.

Past entries:
2004Empty Souls#60

76. Gang Starr - You Know My Steez

Frequency illusion returns! I have been waiting to reach this Gang Starr album for so long even though I only knew one song on it. Having now heard the album, it's extremely in my lane, and Guru & Premier are such a perfect match.

75. Neutral Milk Hotel - Ghost

I am well aware of my tendency to complain about songs being overproduced. Nonetheless it's pretty much the defining characteristic of this song. It's not a track I recalled by name (there are plenty of others which do a bit more to...make their presence known) but it proved to be something of a banger when I revisited it.

Past entries:
1998In The Aeroplane Over The Sea#83

74. Black Star - Definition

It is perfectly reasonable that you wouldn't know, but in saying that, listening to this track will make it very clear that Black Star is Mos Def and Talib Kweli, best alliance in hip hop. I feel like the album might grow on me more if I ever go back to it because it was fairly dense to take in. I can latch onto this track though as a bite-sized piece with production that really pops off.

Past entries (Mos Def):
1999Ms. Fat Booty#21
1999Mathematics#45
1999Speed Law#57
1999UMI Says#76
2004Two Words (with Kanye West)#72
2010Stylo (with Gorillaz)#63

73. The Superjesus - Ashes

This feels like very much standard Superjesus affair at this part of their career, but if you recall, nearly all of their songs placed really high in my Hottest 100 rank so this appearing here makes perfect sense. Calling it standard makes it seem more perfunctory than it is though, it's just that they're so good at these unexpected twists in melody during the chorus that it's maybe not as surprising as it should be. Still sounds great though.

72. Miss Kittin & The Hacker - Frank Sinatra

This was mentioned in the commentary of a recent Logo round and I didn't really recognise it as a song I properly knew, specifically I didn't realise it was a song that was sitting in one of my Spotify playlists for this list, so that might have endeared it a little further for me. It's clearly the "Doctor Worm" of dark electropop because nearly every lyric is memorable in its own way. I don't know any other song that laughs about the fact that a living musician is dead and then tells you to suck a woman's dick. Sadly unlike "James Brown Is Dead" I find myself very skeptical that Frank Sinatra ever heard this song.

Past entries:
19981982#96

71. Madonna - Little Star

It is hard to write again on another Madonna track that fires on similar cylinders to the last one. Once again it's remarkably lush, though along with that, there's a certain level of nuance to Madonna's vocal delivery that makes the chorus a slam dunk.

Past entries:
1998Drowned World / Substitute For Love#94
70. Elliott Smith - Sweet Adeline

Now this is Elliott Smith as I know him, sounding so defeated but so elegant. Well at least until the chorus which in itself is another typical trope with a cacophany of instrumentation in a more major key (I think).

Past entries:
1998Baby Britain#93
2000Son Of Sam#41
2004Memory Lane#49

69. Refused - The Shape Of Punk To Come

This album is of course the source of one of the greatest RateYourMusic reviews I've ever seen, one that I could remember vividly having not seen it in years. As for me with Refused, I had listened to and enjoyed this album a lot when I first heard it a few years back. I can report that socks remain very much rocked off. It was hard to pick out songs for this list though because a lot of them rely on a general aesthetic with the tracks backing each other up, and so they don't always work on their own. This title track however stands up pretty well on its own, with its irregular riff patterns generally keeping consistent as it goes.

Past entries:
2015Elektra#68

68. Mansun - Legacy

I've often thought to myself that Britpop might not actually be that great but only seems so because of about 3 or 4 bands whose popularity might justify it alone, but there are also way too many also-rans with little to offer. Mansun probably don't really belong under that banner but are just dragged under it because they're a UK band who got popular in the Oasis era and not the Coldplay era. Although now that I compare them to Oasis maybe it is fair because they do have a tendency to bloat out their tracks. What I need to clarify with this is that Mansun are generally quite good from what I've heard. "Legacy" has one of the best hooks to come out of the scene.

67. Elvis Costello & Burt Bacharach - This House Is Empty Now

This felt like a bit of a meme to me when I was making this list because Elvis Costello & Burt Bacharach is already a somewhat random pairing and together they feel very out of place on my list. That's not to say I wasn't primed for this, as I was familiar with their collaborative work prior when they teamed up on the soundtrack to the second Austin Powers film. Actually that film series is extremely just a gateway for me appreciating Burt's work. Not to say Costello isn't a highly acclaimed artist too whose few hit songs I know, I really like. This is not really in the line of those hits and instead is one of the most devastatingly sad break up songs I've ever heard. It's a bit of an alternate take on "A House Is Not A Home" which Burt also wrote several decades prior to this, insert Diddy meme.

66. OutKast - Da Art Of Storytellin' (Pt. 1)

I have heard people say that "Aquemini" is so pivotal in shaping hip-hop to come that you can hear multiple landmark albums' blueprints in it. I am not familiar enough really to make a similar sweeping statement, but I do think that you can hear a lot of "good kid, m.A.A.d city" in this track. The combination of...story telling suburban lyrics with badly resolved encounters, a spacious backing beat and a catchy chorus leads a lot to that comparison.

Past entries:
1998Skew It On The Bar-B (feat Raekwon)#89
2000B.O.B.#6
2000Ms. Jackson#19
2000So Fresh, So Clean#82
2001The Whole World (feat Killer Mike)#23
2003Hey Ya!#37
2003Prototype#59
2003GhettoMusick#83

65. The Living End - Save The Day

After getting through their entire career of diminished returns I've finally reached the landmark self-titled Living End album...well most of it. "Save The Day" has been a favourite of mine for as long as I've known it, just so much youthful energy. Maybe it doesn't distinguish itself as much as other singles from the album, but that's only because they set such a high bar with the same template.

Past entries:
2000Pictures In The Mirror#81
2002One Said To The Other#26
2003End Of The World#15
2006Wake Up#79
2008Moment In The Sun#55
2008White Noise#80
2011Song For The Lonely#25
2011Machine Gun#90

64. K's Choice - Everything For Free

I'm always a little bit trepidatious about bands who I only know because of the fact they've had success on rock radio, but not from anyone really giving them kudos. There are no shortage of artists whose success seems primarily radio driven yet seem to make no impression and there's probably a good reason for that. For K's Choice, that's mainly one song, "Not An Addict" which was a top 5 rock radio hit in the US that I'm sure I've heard but can't remember. With that in mind though, I quite quickly connected to this song instead. This song probably might not do much convincing because it just sounds so of its time, but I tended to joke to myself that this was the best Superjesus song on my playlist. Their lead singer is even named Sarah! Nonetheless the roughness in her voice does a decent amount to make it sound a bit better than just basic radio rock.

63. Stardust - Music Sounds Better With You

Obviously the highlight of my YouTube channel is a video that you are unable to watch for the kind of obvious reason that I played the entirety of this song and about half of its music video alongside it. The video is noteworthy because it's one of the greatest distillings of expressing the joy of childhood wonder. It also has as a very personal trope because you get to see someone excitedly watching their favourite song climb to the top of the charts. This is an apt song to do such a thing because it's also a song about expressing the joy that music provides and turning it into a personal experience with another person. And this all works because it's such a joyful song to listen to.

62. Placebo - Pure Morning

I don't quite have the same adoration of this song as most do, which might be because I prefer my Placebo songs at a higher tempo (mostly). In saying that though they tend to do better as well when their songs develop somewhere but this seems to mostly rest on its initial style. To its credit though, it is an extremely effective bit of industrial sludge, with mechanical sounding guitars. It makes a great early impression to say the least.

Past entries:
2000Special K#14
2000Taste In Men#22
2003The Bitter End#18
2006Song To Say Goodbye#70
2006Infra-Red#74
2006Meds#84
2009Battle For The Sun#15
2009For What It's Worth#88

61. The Smashing Pumpkins - Ava Adore

This was a curious call to make because a lot of what makes "Pure Morning" work is also present in "Ava Adore". I was wondering if triple j voters had a similar dilemma, and then I looked up and saw that the two songs were only 4 places apart. While this was the bigger chart hit, being from established hit makers, triple j voters did plump for the fresh upstarts...and I put them next to each other. It succeeds in the classic Smashing Pumpkins way of developing the melody into the chorus in a way that still manages to sound exciting.

Past entries:
2007Tarantula#31
60. The Tamperer (feat Maya) - Feel It

Something of a bit of a ridiculous idea that manages to work. Sampling an extremely well known song tends to be risky territory because you're inviting comparisons to something with a much more established fanbase...and this is The Jacksons for goodness sake. The song rests entirely on the sample with only a little more of a boost to it, and that's fine enough. I think we all know the real reason it works is because someone decided that the best thing to do with this sample is to put the sounds of an absolutely deranged ex-girlfriend over it. Maya's performance elevates it so much. From the seething anger running through every line, the very creative way of describing a black eye, and from that..."WHAT?!" just on its own is enough for the price of admission.

59. Gang Starr - Work

I could imagine JAY-Z rapping over a beat like this, as it has that sort of classy bounce to it. I find it hard to comment on the song otherwise because it basically just works very well at what it does. Guru's rapping is effortlessly slick as all the rhymes just seem to fall into place.

Past entries:
1998You Know My Steez#76

58. Massive Attack - Inertia Creeps

I think people most often remember the Massive Attack songs with female vocalists as they elevate their dark style into something strangely beautiful. The alternative you tend to get is songs like this which succeed in their own menacing way. It's surprisingly easy to get stuck in your head.

Past entries:
1998Group Four#88
2010Paradise Circus (feat Hope Sandoval)#91
2016The Spoils (feat Hope Sandoval)#39

57. Busta Rhymes - Gimme Some More

Busta Rhymes' commercial breakthrough in Australia came along so late that it's hard for me to think of him as someone who was popular in the '90s...I have the same thing with Missy Elliott. It also might have given me a bad impression of him because for years I just thought of him as the latest guest rapper of the time even if he didn't have that many guest verses in the charts...I guess "Don't Cha" was just that big. But with that sort of association I didn't really know where his talents were, and that he was at a time a really exciting entity in the charts. Mainly because in a pre-Twista era, he had an unrivaled ability to flow quickly and effortlessly. "Gimme Some More" isn't really his best representation of this, but the intense pace of the music really elevates things in a way that works just as well.

Past entries:
2002I Know What You Want (with Mariah Carey)#32
2013Thank You (feat Q-Tip, Kanye West & Lil Wayne)#14
2016Dis Generation (with A Tribe Called Quest)#19

56. System Of A Down - Suite-Pee

You know it really is hard to sit down and write all of this stuff without just resorting to saying 'yo this slaps'...because, yo this slaps. The 2.5 minute mark is a good fit for System Of A Down who get enough energy out in a short time so that you don't need much more.

Past entries:
1998Peephole#80
1998P.L.U.C.K.#84
2001Chop Suey!#6
2001Forest#13
2001Toxicity#22
2001Aerials#26
2001Jet Pilot#32
2001Deer Dance#59
2001Bounce#61
2001Prison Song#70
2001Shimmy#73
2001Needles#82
2001Psycho#86
2001Science#95
2002Innervision#56
2005Kill Rock 'n' Roll#5
2005Hypnotize#13
2005Radio/Video#24
2005B.Y.O.B.#30
2005Revenga#32

55. Beastie Boys - Body Movin'

I don't think it really clicked with me just how fun this track was until recently. "Hello Nasty" kind of has another song that steals the show and so this has always just been there by comparison. I think this song was helped in the charts by the Fatboy Slim remix but I find the original version works a lot better. The production just suits the rapping a bit better. It follows the Wu-Tang formula of taking daggy audio from kung-fu movies which just fits really well, and there's a nice moment at the end where the chorus changes up ever so slightly in a way I can't describe.

54. System Of A Down - War?

I had a lot of trouble ranking these last two System songs because they're probably the most similar songs in this list. They basically work on the exact same level and so how the heck do you appraise them?! I suppose this track ends a bit better, with an effective return to the chorus after a bit of a diversion (which also fits in a bit better).

Past entries:
1998Suite-Pee#56
1998Peephole#80
1998P.L.U.C.K.#84
2001Chop Suey!#6
2001Forest#13
2001Toxicity#22
2001Aerials#26
2001Jet Pilot#32
2001Deer Dance#59
2001Bounce#61
2001Prison Song#70
2001Shimmy#73
2001Needles#82
2001Psycho#86
2001Science#95
2002Innervision#56
2005Kill Rock 'n' Roll#5
2005Hypnotize#13
2005Radio/Video#24
2005B.Y.O.B.#30
2005Revenga#32

53. PJ Harvey - A Perfect Day Elise

I somehow avoided ever tweeting a joke about PJ Harvey's album being titled "Is This Desire". The album was something of a weird listen, it frequently made me wonder if she invented dubstep with its decidedly un-1998 aesthetic. Maybe it'll grow on me one day but for the time being I did really connect with this track. It's quite different to what I'm used to from her as it's a bit grungey. The chorus still manages to cut through with a nice contrast in the aesthetics.

Past entries:
2000This Mess We're In (feat Thom Yorke)#77
2000A Place Called Home#97

52. Elliott Smith - Independence Day

Honestly this isn't a very ghetto song but it is relaxing. There is something slightly unsettling whenever you hear someone talk about the fragility of life when part of their defining legacy is just how short their life was cut. Particularly when it's often believed to be a suicide, it makes you read into lyrics like this to see if you can piece together the psyche of someone who would go on to take their own life. Okay maybe this wasn't so relaxing at all but the song is still nice to listen to.

Past entries:
1998Sweet Adeline#70
1998Baby Britain#93
2000Son Of Sam#41
2004Memory Lane#49

51. UNKLE (feat Thom Yorke) - Rabbit In Your Headlights

I've known this song for so long and had no real reason to talk about it. I mostly couldn't even remember how it sounded but it left a strong impression on me with its video, and I generally think of it immediately when I hear the titular phrase, which is quite evocative in its own right. There's also a curiosity in what this does sound like compared to the other UNKLE song I know from a decade into the future, to which I suppose you could argue is a case of the guest artists directing it a bit but really it's probably just that UNKLE changed their style over the years. Nonetheless it has Thom Yorke on it so obviously I'm all in on this. In terms of this countdown series, you could see it as a prelude to something major that's just around the corner.

Past entries (UNKLE):
2007Burn My Shadow (feat Ian Astbury)#54

Past entries (Thom Yorke):
2000This Mess We're In (with PJ Harvey)#77
50. Whitney Houston - I Learned From The Best

This is a similar amount of weirdness to my #100 pick, although I have known Whitney's 1998 work to have a bit more appreciation. It feels like Whitney is in an odd position with how her career is looked back upon just because for such a vocal powerhouse, the material she got didn't really give her much chance to spread her wings. On 1998's "My Love Is Your Love" she worked with some more on trend producers like Babyface & Missy Elliott who did quite a bit to keep her up with the times. This is a great segue for me to say that instead of any of the other singles which are generally quite solid, I've gone for the Diane Warren ballad. I am not sure she will ever again get into one of these lists but time will tell. This mainly gets in though because it has some of my favourite vocal runs from Whitney I've ever heard. It's also just a really cold diss to an ex-lover.
49. Gang Starr - The Rep Growz Bigga

This song starts with a really long skit, because "Moment Of Truth" frequently blends tracks into each other so they tend to be at the start just as often as they are in the end. While the prior entries were generally fun and upbeat, there's a certain amount of aggression to this one. Production-wise there's a bit more of a stomp to fit this. Otherwise I kind of find it interesting to hear Guru lament that their output wasn't really netting them any profit, especially since I now know that they had a hit single in the past (though I suppose just Australia doesn't account for much). Either way it's impressive how Guru can pull off both of these guises to strong effect.

Past entries:
1998Work#59
1998You Know My Steez#76
48. Fatboy Slim - Praise You

As a counterpoint to his previous entry, this is a Fatboy Slim song that I've known as long as I can remember, but one I would describe as being much more odd than it seemed on the surface. It kind of straddles the line on whether or not it can be considered a conventional pop hit because it has nearly everything expected, but severely lacks in lyrics and finds the usual wild ways to be weird ('shou-u-u-u-u-u-u-u-u-u-u-uuuuuuuuuuuuu...'). It gets away with it because the main pay off is always so satisfying. There's also a certain joy in the music video that always makes me think fondly of the song as well.

Past entries:
1998Right Here, Right Now#79
47. 椎名林檎 - すべりだい

Listing the name in Japanese is an excuse for me to not commit to putting a romanised surname first or last, for which I've had so many conflicting instances that it feels wrong to me both ways. To clarify Sheena is her surname and Ringo is her first name except not really because it's a stage name. If you would also like to read the title, it is read as 'Su-be-ri-da-i', I haven't actually spotted it in the lyrics but I haven't looked very hard and I'm bad at keeping up with Japanese speaking. I am not sure if I have a pre-disposition to Japanese music over Korean music because of how Japanese content I consume but then my experiences are also still extremely limited. What I like is that this doesn't really fit into one basket other than just being fun, catchy music.
46. Madonna - Ray Of Light

I've had some mixed thoughts on this song just because it's more than a bit overplayed and it took a while for me to appreciate it on its own merits. It's also something I've known as a thing that existed long before I knew it was a Madonna song, that was a bit of a surprise to learn. Given how down-tempo this album is, this sticks out as an obvious hit, proving that William Orbit's production style can still function as a proper banger. There's always so much going on here.

Past entries:
1998Little Star#71
1998Drowned World / Substitute For Love#94
45. Garbage - Push It

Evidently Garbage found their groove on the first album and kept it up with the second. I frequently forget which songs besides "Vow" are on which album. Nonetheless the beats go harder in this track and I have little else to say.

Past entries:
1998Temptation Waits#78
1999The World Is Not Enough#30
2001Cherry Lips (Go Baby Go!)#15
2001Androgyny#33
2005Why Do You Love Me#87
2016So We Can Stay Alive#31
44. Lauryn Hill - Everything Is Everything

I feel like I heard this somewhere else before because it has a familiarity I can't really place. It stands out regardless with its string heavy production and serves for another nice reprieve in the late track listing. There's a fascinating effect where it feels like a lot of her lines in the chorus feel like they're recorded against each other rather than alongside, which makes it feel oddly cluttered. It works though because all the vocal runs are so good.

Past entries:
1998I Used To Love Him#95
43. Refused - Summerholidays vs. Punkroutine

This might be the most conventional song on "The Shape Of Punk To Come" for the simple reason that it has a chorus and there's considerably less screaming than usual. To make an extremely Swedish comparison, it feels like proto Hives and I feel it could work out well on the radio. Then again maybe they'd rather be forgotten than remembered for giving in to convention.

Past entries:
1998The Shape Of Punk To Come#69
2015Elektra#68
42. Placebo - Every You Every Me

If we want to talk about Placebo songs that I don't quite like as much as is generally the case, it's hard to look past the band's most enduring hit song. Then again I've never seen "Cruel Intentions" so for all I know, its inclusion there gives it an extremely notable link to a point in time that can't really be understood on the periphery. It wouldn't be the first '90s song to do it. It might be the first '90s song to flip its chorus whose hook includes the same word repeated first and third, but the other two words are out of order in the title. Naturally because of this I've had my troubles getting the title right at times. Nonetheless the song does work pretty well at what it does outside of that.

Past entries:
1998Pure Morning#62
2000Special K#14
2000Taste In Men#22
2003The Bitter End#18
2006Song To Say Goodbye#70
2006Infra-Red#74
2006Meds#84
2009Battle For The Sun#15
2009For What It's Worth#88
41. You Am I - Heavy Heart

As I have noted to my dismay in the past, You Am I have never had a top 20 hit despite having 9 top 50 hits to their name. I think the reason for this is that they never had the right song at the right time. "Berlin Chair" is of course their enduring opus, but was one of those breakthrough hits that don't really translate to big chart hits, but instead allow for years of them in the future. The other aspect of it is that they also had this song which might be their most radio friendly, except it came too late in the singles run of an album a little bit too late after their commercial peak so it doesn't look like anything of much note in their chart history. I think the lesson in this is that describing the pitiable mess you make in a break up is much more interesting than calling out the ex. The song is full of great imagery like that which makes it feel like it comes from a real place.

Past entries:
2000Damage#98
2001Get Up#93
40. The Superjesus - Now & Then

Yo it's more extremely competent post-grunge slow burning. Maybe though it is interesting for an even earlier precursor to the age of every Australian band becoming more sophisticated by adding more strings. It's more than just that though, the vocal run on the bridge is excellent. Also this band used to follow me on Twitter.

Past entries:
1998Ashes#73
39. Jennifer Paige - Crush

I know you know this song. As much as I tend to revile the term 'pure pop', I can understand that sometimes it does come from a wholesome place. Because when you think of that term, you probably think of something like this, a song that doesn't remotely challenge the listener and for that matter, even the subject of the song who is decidedly just a little crush. I've always loved this song though. There aren't many songs that can make me zoom back this far in time, and also hold up well on their own merits, but this is definitely one of them.
38. MC Lyte (feat Gina Thompson) - It's All Yours

Speaking of chill love songs, here's one that's much more committal. I'm not super familiar with MC Lyte's prior hits (she was a lot more popular before this album I believe) but I quite like what I've heard thus far. It's kind of curious that she makes a Romeo & Juliet reference that only slightly seems to understand the gravitas of that situation, but then she further goes with Bonnie & Clyde so I suppose there's some consistency in it. It is kind of funny just how lovey-dovey this song is when the other song I heard from her was all about going hard.
37. OutKast - Rosa Parks

On the topic of noted famous people in the 20th century still being alive...did you know that Rosa Parks didn't die until 2005 when she was 92 years old? I can make jokes and speculation about James Brown & Frank Sinatra but Rosa Parks definitely heard this song, in fact she tried to sue OutKast over it, with those legal proceedings carrying on for about 6 years. It does seem like the only reason the song has her name is because of the chorus line 'everybody move to the back of the bus', and aside from that it's just a party jam. Sonically it reminds me a little of Nelly's "Ride Wit Me", or even more specifically but more obscurely, DJ Shadow's "Enuff".

Past entries:
1998Da Art Of Storytellin' (Pt. 1)#68
1998Skew It On The Bar-B (feat Raekwon)#89
2000B.O.B.#6
2000Ms. Jackson#19
2000So Fresh, So Clean#82
2001The Whole World (feat Killer Mike)#23
2003Hey Ya!#37
2003Prototype#59
2003GhettoMusick#83
36. Custard - Girls Like That (Don't Go for Guys Like Us)

I must say that it is really fun to call this an incel anthem but I feel like that undersells Custard's wit in their songwriting. Or maybe because no incel would ever take rejection as a gleeful opportunity to keep on looking for that loving feeling. That and I don't think anyone is genuinely listening to this to lament their failings. Personally for me it's just really fun pop that has an added obsession with Julio Iglesias.

Past entries:
1999Ringo (I Feel Like)#61
35. Pulp - The Fear

Pulp's "Different Class" was a massive success that was certainly buoyed by a certain two songs which I hope to eventually talk about at length because they warrant it. They did not really try to replicate it and instead went to pure indulgence in the follow up. That's not to say there isn't merit to it, it's just not really wrapped up in the form of catchy pop songs. But even in saying that, this song does poke out with a big hook.

Past entries:
2001Bad Cover Version#42
34. Massive Attack - Angel

This has a surprisingly high playcount on Spotify which always makes me think playlists, but also there's the cynical approach that it's the first track on an acclaimed album that makes people think 'let's see what's so great about th...oh this is it?' Who can account for taste after all, but this for me is definitely worth the price of admission. There's something so effective about how minimal the vocals are, that they seem to just pop in and out of the mix as if another instrument, and the instrumental is pretty intense too, a bit post-rock really which is quite a divergence from the expected presentation.

Past entries:
1998Inertia Creeps#58
1998Group Four#88
2010Paradise Circus (feat Hope Sandoval)#91
2016The Spoils (feat Hope Sandoval)#39
33. Britney Spears - ...Baby One More Time

This song is 20 years old now, I'm not sure if you knew this. It has also been 20 years since it entered the Billboard charts, the ARIA Charts, the UK Charts, 20 years since it hit #1 on all of these charts, and 20 years since the album of the same name was released. The odd thing I've observed with it is that I feel a lot of the nostalgia pushed around this track is from the industry which benefitted from it. I'm not at all about to suggest that it's not popular, but I sometimes feel like its massive success mis-represents how popular it is now, which is to say it doesn't *quite* stack up on the trickle streams & sales. Maybe people have had enough of it, maybe people are too cool for it, I dunno. I'm not here to slate the song though obviously because what a song it is. In terms of hook-laden songwriting it's second to pretty much nothing, Max Martin knows exactly what he's doing here (although in saying that I often wonder if it suffers from a bit of mis-anticipated fanfare in the sense that listening back to the song shows that they really hammer in the 'loneliness' lyrics just slightly more than it seems it is a draw card. It feels weird in the bridge is all), and I can't imagine anyone but Britney singing it at this point.

Past entries:
2003Toxic#39
32. Neutral Milk Hotel - Holland, 1945

Now back to the things I'm supposed to be good at talking about here and I never know what to say now. "Holland, 1945" is oddly enough the only single released from "In The Aeroplane Over The Sea", which feels moderately strange just because it's not exactly a title that sticks to a song. It's quite a thumper though.

Past entries:
1998Ghost#75
1998In The Aeroplane Over The Sea#83
31. The Living End - West End Riot

I ruin the song for myself just because whenever I hear the concept of all these kids getting excited to have some sort of over-dramatic war every week with their friends. What I'm saying is that if you pretend this song is about Fortnite what actually changes? That being said it's surprisingly focused on a topic for an early Living End song, it makes me kind of think about whenever I got to write about something that interested me for school, I'd get really detailed in ways no one really cared about. Oh and obviously it's riff city.

Past entries:
1998Save The Day#65
2000Pictures In The Mirror#81
2002One Said To The Other#26
2003End Of The World#15
2006Wake Up#79
2008Moment In The Sun#55
2008White Noise#80
2011Song For The Lonely#25
2011Machine Gun#90
30. Lauryn Hill - Doo Wop (That Thing)

I'm often undecided on whether or not the full listening experience of this song lives up to the promise. Like for instance you remember it for the soaring hooks, but actually go back to listen to it and it's quite a long song with tangents everywhere. With its big bombast it could be seen as proto "Crazy In Love" which put more focus on what was known to work. Nonetheless, even if you are all about that thing, that thing, that thing, that being the hook, it is in a league of its own.

Past entries:
1998Everything Is Everything#44
1998I Used To Love Him#95
29. The Cardigans - My Favourite Game

To some people it'll look like I stole this observation just because I couldn't get to it first but the hook in this song is very much in the same DNA as 'wow-wa-oh' from "Addicted To Bass". It's surprising just how much it elevates the song which is instrumentally tight, but maybe a bit too dulled down to pop out as much as it could. You do get a great moment with the drum rollick on the chorus.
28. Xzibit - What U See Is What U Get

I thought it was a bit random that Xzibit would be making an appearance on my list largely because I forgot he was on last year's list too. Nonetheless he also fits into that Busta Rhymes box of me not being able to think of him as a '90s rapper. But then again it's hard to not think of him first as an actor...or maybe as a meme. This was completely new to me but I loved it on first listen. It has the same sort of chilling vibe as some of my favourite Kendrick tracks, and Xzibit brings all the appropriate bravado.

Past entries:
1999What's The Difference (with Dr. Dre)#92
27. N.O.R.E. - Superthug

On the other hand, this song took a little longer to click with me, but once it did I never looked back. While I might generally like a lot of hip hop that locks into a certain groove, this song does none of that. It's a Neptunes production and if that's not obvious enough, Pharrell comes along later on the song to interpolate "Heart Of Glass". It's kind of curious to me that the song is called "Superthug", but uses the word 'superstar' in the chorus, which made me think that it's a response to another song of that name and using it as the basis...but it is not to my knowledge. N.O.R.E. came up with the genius idea to say what a lot, and if I had creative abilities I would absolutely make a Simpsons meme out of Rappin' Noreaga.
26. Fishmans - ゆらめき IN THE AIR

You never really know what to expect when a 13 minute song comes onto the playlist. I usually try to make sure I'm willing to sit through the whole duration of what will probably be ineffectual listening. But hey, sometimes they justify their appearance completely, and that's how I discovered Fishmans. I don't know much about them except that they're a Japanese band with a lot of different genre influences, and plenty of very passionate fans. I was pretty much won over before this even finished so I can see why probably. This is just one of the most elegant and beautiful tracks I've ever come across, and may well be not high enough in this list just because it's hard to take the time to get accustomed to it.
25. Big Pun (feat N.O.R.E.) - You Came Up

Good times for N.O.R.E. in this list. I don't think this is a particularly revered single, but it's insanely good vibes. It kind of amuses me that this came out in the same year as "Superthug" and N.O.R.E. is already owning his "Superthug" hook which shows up in the chorus here. The main reason this is in here is because I had no idea how much I liked Big Pun. All I really knew before this is that he had a certain amount of fanfare but died very young (actually about a month before his only ARIA top 50 hit alongside Jennifer Lopez hit the chart), and there's the comment that Fat Joe sort of owes his career to this in a Diddy way because the two were in a similar lane but no one was ever going to plump for the lesser of the two unless they needed to. Rags to riches songs can be a mixed back because you have to really get across the hustle such that your microbe audience can feel elated for you, rather than spite your unrelateable come up. For Big Pun it's easy because his position as a Latino rapper makes him rather unprecedented, and he's just really talented.

Past entries (N.O.R.E.):
1998Superthug#27
24. New Radicals - You Get What You Give

This is a song that I think garners some of the most extreme reactions out of any song that has ever existed. For a while I thought 'yeah sure whatever it's just a harmless radio hit' but having given it more attention, I definitely can see why it rubs people the wrong way. At the same time oh my god I actually love it after all these years. If it's hard to do a "Started From The Bottom" right, it is surely even harder to get across what this song is doing. It is notedly a really bad idea to tell a depressed person to 'just cheer up lol', and what is that but only a fine line away from what this song is doing. So if that doesn't work for someone I get it, but all these uplifting chords are just joy to me, it's just power pop perfection. Also that outro is a thing that is there, which kind of amuses me because it trojan horses people into hearing it, and also something something 'Beck and Hanson'.
23. Placebo - You Don't Care About Us

I generally assume that this is not really a noteworthy single to many people compared to what else is on this album but I love it so much (then again I thought this about Something For Kate's "Hallways"). There's just something in the sheer grit of the chorus that makes the repetitive hook click so well with me. Then the bridge comes along and transitions into an even bigger chorus. That's a really good pay off. Also now having covered their general era that I'm most familiar with, it's a bit weird to think this might be the last time Placebo appears in one of these lists.

Past entries:
1998Every You Every Me#42
1998Pure Morning#62
2000Special K#14
2000Taste In Men#22
2003The Bitter End#18
2006Song To Say Goodbye#70
2006Infra-Red#74
2006Meds#84
2009Battle For The Sun#15
2009For What It's Worth#88
22. Big Pun (feat Fat Joe) - Twinz (Deep Cover 98)

It has possibly said more than once that Joey Bada$$ has released a lot of music reminiscent of the '90s. I have never felt that more than when I listened to this song which immediately made me want to listen to "No. 99" as they had very similar guitar lines (it's also hard not to think of Joey when Big Pun calls Fat Joe 'Joey' in the chorus). I also thought that it's where I knew the '187...' line but that was only closely true because it was in Dr. Dre's "Genocide" which came out the same year. Incidentally, the chain goes both ways because this song cribs it from Dr. Dre's song..."Deep Cover", his first post N.W.A. single. Also really I just wanted to diss Fat Joe earlier in this list with the knowledge that he was going to appear not much later. He's a fun presence here but Big Pun totally steals the show with his incredible flow.

Past entries (Big Pun):
1998You Came Up (feat N.O.R.E.)#25
21. S.O.A.P. - This Is How We Party

I love this song because of Tame Impala. That sentence is so marvellously dumb that I kind of want to just let it sit there but I'll explain. We're talking way back in 2010 when I'd only just started uni, and brought along with me my phone which didn't have any data, but could connect to the radio. I once just happened to have my lunch break listening to the band doing a Take 5 on triple j. I forget the topic of it, but I know that at some point in it, they dropped this incredibly jarring guilty pleasure and I just could not get enough of it. It was like discovering a new fragment of the over-the-top late '90s teen pop that somehow passed me by. Complete with weird g-funk synths for some reason. I was on board with it instantly. I'm not sure I'd have ever come across another proper opportunity to reach it otherwise if I hadn't just so happened to hear it then, except of course when Logo gets there.
20. Black Box Recorder - Child Psychology

A twisted part of me really wanted to put this song next to New Radicals, and as I got further and further down the list, that started looking like a statistical possibility, there were less positions to separate them after all. If I did it would be one of the most jarringly terrible playlisting decisions of all time. First you have this song that tells you that you've got the music in you, you've got a reason to live. And then you go straight to 'life is unfair, kill yourself or get over it' (okay it's still a bit much next to S.O.A.P.). Nonetheless it's a very noteworthy song for Black Box Recorder, arguably the song that defined their career despite not reaching the top 40 like some of their later singles. I wasn't prepared to just like it on that one premise though. It took a while to gel with me before I really paid close ear to the lyrics and found the sardonic misery of the song's narrative compelling. If not for the hook, it ends on the biggest gut punch of line satirising Christmas chaos in one biting phrase: 'batteries not included'. It's seen as a sort of antithesis to Britpop and the chorus guitar line that sounds a lot like a few Radiohead songs also contributes a bit to that.

Past entries:
2000The Facts Of Life#83
2003These Are The Things#77
19. Alanis Morissette - Uninvited

I've known this song for a long time, I think because my mum had the "City Of Angels" soundtrack. I also know I heard the Freemasons version of it on Take40 but I don't think I connected it to this (see also the two versions of "Bizarre Love Triangle"). It also took a while to uncover this because it was an Alanis Morissette song that wasn't in her hit catalogue on this site as it wasn't released as a single. This is also decidedly different to the sort of angst that Alanis brought to the table with "Jagged Little Pill" and its follow up album (which isn't represented here but "Joining You" was quite close). I guess in that sense it fills the same role as Garbage's "The World Is Not Enough" which I also ranked highly last year. It's a perfect combination of melody and the voice that makes it come together.
18. System Of A Down - Sugar

While I didn't really know the first System Of A Down album, I did know this song. I don't exactly know why, I think it might have just been a random Limewire download or something at the time. Nonetheless I've listened to this song a lot in the last decade. I'm not sure I was a particularly huge fan of it for a while because it seemed weird in a 'this band haven't reached their peak yet' way. It's definitely my 2nd favourite song called "Sugar", but my favourite that has more than 200,000 plays on Spotify. Like every other song of theirs on this list, it just brings so much loud energy.

Past entries:
1998War?#54
1998Suite-Pee#56
1998Peephole#80
1998P.L.U.C.K.#84
2001Chop Suey!#6
2001Forest#13
2001Toxicity#22
2001Aerials#26
2001Jet Pilot#32
2001Deer Dance#59
2001Bounce#61
2001Prison Song#70
2001Shimmy#73
2001Needles#82
2001Psycho#86
2001Science#95
2002Innervision#56
2005Kill Rock 'n' Roll#5
2005Hypnotize#13
2005Radio/Video#24
2005B.Y.O.B.#30
2005Revenga#32
17. Neutral Milk Hotel - Two-Headed Boy

This might have been the first song I really loved on the album, just because the melody was so instant. I can ruin the song slightly because the intro guitar sounds almost identical to "Bevan The Musical". It's almost peak Mangum when you get into it though and he peaks beyond control. It's kind of weird how beautiful screaming can sound honestly.

Past entries:
1998Holland, 1945#32
1998Ghost#75
1998In The Aeroplane Over The Sea#83
16. The Mavis's - Cry

Ah now this is just some amazing lightning in a bottle. It's funny to me that in terms of the chart The Mavis's are a one hit wonder, when of course they have multiple Hottest 100 hits, but more notably for me, nearly every time one of their songs comes up on my playlists, I recognise it from my childhood. I have no idea what sort of soundtrack syncs they were getting but "Happiness" and "Coming Home" are immensely familiar to me and have about 7,000 plays on Spotify between them (this song has just shy of half a million). Though I suppose I can understand this might be all people want from the band because I'm not sure anything does come close.
15. Beastie Boys - Intergalactic

This song has the best hook and it's just two words in a robotic word. Or maybe that's not fair because the instrumental breakdown after that is just as potent. Otherwise this is just vintage Beastie Boys. Maybe someone thinks finishing each line in tandem is a lame gimmick, but honestly it's just a perfect combination of camaraderie and hype. A point of amusement for me is towards the end when Mike D references an older song of theirs with the iconic '...DROP!' hook. I had never realised at the time that they'd done it twice, so for the longest time I got very confused in terms of who was sampling whom, because The Pharcyde's "Drop" is older than this song, but it sounds like the one that's doing the sample. As a side note, it is also entirely possible that Beastie Boys owe their high positions to the fact that they appeared on a Futurama episode. It worked for Beck and it probably worked for them too.

Past entries:
1998Body Movin'#55
14. Air - Sexy Boy

I've never tired of this song. I feel it's just a perfect soundscape that could keep on going forever to my liking. Similar to a lot of the Massive Attack songs, it strikes a balance of beauty despite a certain amount of terror to some of the individual components.

Past entries:
2004Surfing On A Rocket#31
2004Cherry Blossom Girl#42
2007Once Upon A Time#44
13. Elliott Smith - Waltz #2 (XO)

The version of this song for Australian audiences means that you pretend he's talking about "Cathy's Clown" the You Am I song. An absolutely beautiful that makes almost all other singer-songwriter songs sound terrible and hacky by comparison.

Past entries:
1998Independence Day#52
1998Sweet Adeline#70
1998Baby Britain#93
2000Son Of Sam#41
2004Memory Lane#49
12. Powderfinger - Passenger

This used to be my favourite Powderfinger song and then I got tremendously sick of it. I've started to come around to it a bit more now though. In saying that I can't help but wonder how differently this song would feel if it didn't sneak in at #100 in the Hottest 100, it'd look like a total shock omission and underrated by default. Incidentally I do think that a lot of its success on the singles chart was due to the fact that it was the easiest way to obtain the soon to be Hottest 100 #1 hit "These Days". It's a bit funny to me though because honestly a lot of the arrangements in the song are really basic, such as the intro riff, and the chromatic scale that leads into the chorus. There's nothing really remarkable about it but it just works.

Past entries:
2000The Metre#7
2000Up & Down & Back Again#29
2000My Kind Of Scene#44
2000Thrilloilogy#69
2000Waiting For The Sun#90
2000My Happiness#92
2003Sunsets#51
2003(Baby I've Got You) On My Mind)#94
2004Bless My Soul#70
11. Fatboy Slim - The Rockafeller Skank

Obviously this serves as a reason for me to recall the fact that I swear I saw a stand up bit (probably on The Comedy Channel) where someone was talking about this song, as if 'Funk Soul Brother' is like the life of the party who is in a manner similar to the Vengabus...always coming but never actually arrives. That hook is a great way though to trojan horse you into one of the most confronting, abrasive, jarring hit songs of all time. That is if you listen to the song in its entirety. It kind of feels like it's teasing the absolute nonsense that's coming around the 3 minute mark when it first starts to tear apart at the seams. It only gets wilder from there. A buzzing synth that sounds like a chainsaw, a loud siren, a drum loop which is considerably less blended into the established mix, and the vocal hook being played increasingly less straight. Very ridiculous and best.

Past entries:
1998Praise You#48
1998Right Here, Right Now#79
10. Gang Starr - Moment of Truth

I'm sure I've said this plenty of times before, but the Dave Mirra Freestyle BMX 2 soundtrack was pivotal to my music fandom. It's moderately cursed because two groups I've discovered from it have had a member pass away since...actually even Dave Mirra has as well. No song takes me back to this awkwardly controlling video game that I inexplicably played a lot quite like "Moment Of Truth" by Gang Starr. Just hearing the main instrumental loop I can see myself trying to pull off the really long grind on the first level, or jumping off the giant waterslide level to score the biggest wipe out. Nonetheless the song also stood out to me for Guru's verses, which felt strangely uplifting to me.

Past entries:
1998The Rep Growz Bigga#49
1998Work#59
1998You Know My Steez#76
9. Fastball - The Way

I'm extremely fascinated by just how many artists who are seen as one hit wonders in some respects have other songs that I know really well for whatever reason. I already mentioned The Mavis's, but this also applies to Semisonic, The Barenaked Ladies, Eagle-Eye Cherry...Portugal. The Man. There's also another brand of this with bands who did have more hits, just not in Australia. Third Eye Blind only have one top 50 hit in Australia which doesn't feel right when "Never Let You Go" and "Jumper" exist. Fastball are one of the weirder examples of this because I have no memory whatsoever of "The Way" from my childhood. I only discovered it via aus-charts this decade. On the other hand, "Out Of My Head" I've known for an extremely long time. That song was close to making this list too. So I want to say that my love of "The Way" comes with no nostalgic attachment but I've probably known it long enough now that it pretty much counts as that anyway. I continue to be impressed at just how well it holds up though. Not only is the chorus melody just a wonderfully uplifting moment, it comes with these quick piano stabs along with it that really spice it up.
8. Massive Attack - Teardrop

Over time I'm starting to join in on the massive love-in that this song tends to receive. It's the sort of song that just feels so effortlessly perfect that it's hard to believe it even exists. I can never not have a good time when I'm listening to it because all the pieces go together into something that is never too confronting, but never meanders too long without a slight change in its elements. If that's not enough, Elizabeth Fraser comes in to deliver an absolutely excellent vocal performance.

Past entries:
1998Angel#34
1998Inertia Creeps#58
1998Group Four#88
2010Paradise Circus (feat Hope Sandoval)#91
2016The Spoils (feat Hope Sandoval)#39
7. The Offspring - The Kids Aren't Alright

Another thing I've said before is that I kind of have a thing for songs about looking back on everything from your home town and how it's in complete shambles and destroys the childhood innocence that frames all memories of it. Having spent most of my formative years in a small town that I've not been to in close to a decade makes it easy for me to reminisce in similar ways. It also helps when the track itself is an absolute banger.
6. The Living End - All Torn Down

I suppose this has some vague similarities to the last track too. This is less about people's lives being ruined by the system not really working out for them, but rather the system ruining the locales to make way for a larger CBD. I'm not sure how long I've known it for but it's been an absolute favourite for all of that time. Going back about ten years it was the source of pointless amusement for me, as whenever I'd go to Wikipedia, I'd start from the article for this song, to the point that it was a mainstay in my most visited pages list. Nowadays I do that on an article about a Chinese TV adaptation of the Romance Of The Three Kingdoms

Past entries:
1998West End Riot#31
1998Save The Day#65
2000Pictures In The Mirror#81
2002One Said To The Other#26
2003End Of The World#15
2006Wake Up#79
2008Moment In The Sun#55
2008White Noise#80
2011Song For The Lonely#25
2011Machine Gun#90
5. Powderfinger - The Day You Come

If "Passenger" comes together lazy fluke, then there's nothing lazy about this track. It feels like it's their bid to move on from the moderate success of "Double Allergic" into becoming the biggest band in the country. It's tender and well-written. Everything feels like a hook, whether it's the brittle guitar riff, or the haunting multi-tracked vocals on the chorus.

Past entries:
1998Passenger#12
2000The Metre#7
2000Up & Down & Back Again#29
2000My Kind Of Scene#44
2000Thrilloilogy#69
2000Waiting For The Sun#90
2000My Happiness#92
2003Sunsets#51
2003(Baby I've Got You) On My Mind)#94
2004Bless My Soul#70
4. Refused - New Noise

So unsurprisingly this was my entry point into Refused. Actually wait I'm lying a tiny bit because it was probably the Bloody Beetroots version of the song. Some may disagree but I do think that version still adheres to the heart of the song. After all, what sounds like it? Whatever you think, it is a new noise. Nonetheless, the original is obviously where it's at. As someone who is generally kept away from overly abrasive sounds, this was something of a shock. I don't really know how else to describe it but it's just relentless energy. You can scream.

Past entries:
1998Summerholidays vs. Punkroutine#43
1998The Shape Of Punk To Come#69
2015Elektra#68
3. Madonna - Frozen

As for this I don't know what else to say but...duh. For all I've said about Orbit productions, this song is pretty much the one that they all aspire to. The drums crackle and explode into the chorus to reveal a beautiful new synth delight, accompanied by a rare case of humming in music that genuinely elevates the mood. I kind of wonder if when I say a song sounds icy, it's because it reminds me of this song called "Frozen".

Past entries:
1998Ray Of Light#48
1998Little Star#71
1998Drowned World / Substitute For Love#94
2. Pulp - This Is Hardcore

Kind of like what I said about their last entry, this is a particular left-turn for the band at the height of their commercial power. Oddly enough though I don't think I even really noticed when I first got into it, I still heard the catchy hooks. Then again around the same time I thought it was weird that MGMT's 2nd album wasn't all that popular so you know where I stand on some things. Still, it's just impressive how much this song has to offer. It feels like there's a big moment waiting around the corner the entire running time. The title drop with the soaring guitar around the 4 minute mark being the obvious climax...an appropriate turn of phrase given the song's subject matter.

Past entries:
1998The Fear#35
2001Bad Cover Version#42
1. Neutral Milk Hotel - Oh Comely

There have been years in the past where I make the list knowing full well what will come out at the top. Then you have years like 1998 where there isn't really the obvious standout song staring at me from the beginning, so when I get towards the end of it, there's a feeling of surprise when I see what songs are left and realise that one of them will be donned at each position. Moments like that are a weirdly joyful part of music appraisal and I think it's why people like making lists. This is not at all a slate against this song which I have loved for many, many years, it just never came to mind that I'd be putting it in this coveted spot, though I do think it is perfectly worthy for it. Maybe given my reputation it is the most obvious thing for me to put at #1 given the album's critical status. At least that surely won't happen again in 1997. I don't know if it says something that the top two songs are both similarly perverted though in different ways. While Pulp's is metaphorical in that it's using sexual lyrics to speak about the music industry, this song is pretty much detailing the ugly situation without masking it behind very much. There's a line about pondering over the fact that no matter how fondly he thinks about Anne Frank, she would never be able to reciprocate it (though I'm sure she'd definitely be a Neutraliever). As much as I want to say all the vivid imagery is what sells me on this song, it's honestly mostly just down to the spectacular delivery. Jeff Mangum recorded all of his contributions to this song in one take (to which a band member responded 'holy shit!' which is heard at the end of the song), and with that you can admittedly hear a bit of wavering as if it's a live performance. That in itself might be part of the charm of the band, because his vocal wailings are so...blatantly unpolished compared to most popular music, but there's just some bizarre success he brings out of it. There are very few vocalists who can just tap into my brain for a brief moment of wonder through a potent delivery. Thom Yorke & Sia do it fairly often, but for "Oh Comely" it's not just a moment, it's like almost the entire song. I'm pretty sure it struck me on my very first listen and I knew I was hearing something special. Holy shit indeed.

Neutral Milk Hotel also have the most entries this year, as do System Of A Down https://i.imgur.com/WWP8lyL.jpg

Past entries:
1998Two-Headed Boy#17
1998Holland, 1945#32
1998Ghost#75
1998In The Aeroplane Over The Sea#83
As a huge fan of Neutral Milk, love the #1 (would have picked In The Aeroplane.... myself ). The line "I wished I could save her in some sort of time machine" is delivered amazingly (sad and weary summing up the song). Didn't know about the one take aspect, will listen out for the holy shit at the end.

Also love your #2, 5, 8, 13, 14, 15 and 17 from the top 20. No Godspeed!? I prefer F#A# to Lift Your Skinny Fists (although they are both great).
F#A# is 1997 right? I've not yet heard it tbh, but I don't know exactly what to expect or if it will gel with me (Skinny Fists took at least a couple listens and that was years ago, post-rock is difficult ). I feel like omissions that are a bit off the beaten-path come with the caveat of 'It's unreasonable for me to give everything the attention it probably warrants', as I listened to about 100 hours of music for this latest list We shall see though.
You're right, it is 1997. Oddly my iTunes library lists it as 1998. Only brought it up because you had every song from Lift Your Skinny Fists in your 2000 list so thought you might be across it. If you make it 101 hours of music for 1997, you can
I'll definitely at least listen to it
Ok, that top 10 is basically unimpeachable. Of course, I totally dig the number one (which appeared in my 2008[?] countdown as that was when I discovered it lol) and it's one of my fave songs ever. Also did not know it was one take, which makes it even more impressive!

I mean, Frozen, New Noise, and Teardrop all would have been great number ones too, so seeing them all top 10 is wild.

1998 me is very happy with the Fatboy Slim, Placebo, and Lauryn Hill littered throughout the list. V v good albums from those 3. Never rated the SOAD album at the time (except for Sugar, so might have too revisit it now).

Great choice of "pop" songs from the year too, especially Crush, ...Baby, and Feel It! And awesome JJJ songs too from Custard, You Am I and Doctor Worm(!!!). Speaking of, Hole and Regurgitator seem like surprise omissions!

Awesome list as per usual
It's one of those few times of the years where I finally finished listening to my endless playlist and made a list, we're up to 1997 now. I'll try to have that up and running at around 4pm on Sunday this week, by which time I should have finally finished writing all the words for it.
1997

Will frequently check older songs at moral playlist

It's beginning to become increasingly redundant to actually recall my own year experiences because there's probably nothing I can recall specifically further than this. 1997 is my first year of school, back in those crazy times when I was living in Western Australia. I was recently talking about how moving resulted in a situation where I was the youngest in my year level by a country mile, everyone being between 4 and 20 months older than me. But back there, everyone was born in the same year I think...and I was still the youngest I think. I'm only not sure because there's another kid who was born on the same day as me, and if I recall correctly, we have each other's middle names as our first names, but I don't know which of us is older. Either way it was something I was excited about because we got to eat cake at school whenever it was someone's birthday, and so two birthdays meant twice as much cake. I'd never get to properly experience it because I spent my birthday home with chicken pox. Other than that, my scattered memories of that year involve sneaking under the bathroom doors to lock them from the inside, and being confused at everyone pretending to be a monster at recess. I can't remember if I felt above the childishness or I was scared, it was probably both. I've always had trouble working on my aspirations, and I remember one day we had to decide what we wanted to be when we grow up. Rather than something exciting like astronaut or firefighter, I said that I want to be a dad.

1997 is my first known experience with music. Or maybe it was 1998 because that can be how exposure to music really works. What I'm saying is that the first hit song I remember hearing enough to notice it was "Tubthumping". A strange song to be introduced to the concept which may have lead to various forms of confusion where shortly after I thought Macy Gray was my grandmother, so maybe I thought Chumbawamba was just a bunch of adults yelling across the room (though it probably was that too), I also definitely thought it was about boxing. Nowadays I probably hear "Amnesia" more and what bangers which will not be appearing in this list they both are. Otherwise, 1997 is a year I've been looking forward to for a long time, probably for an obvious reason, but it also feels like in a way, peak era for the sort of alternative rock that I've gravitated to since my teen years (like, when triple j did their all time countdowns, this was roughly the mean/mode/median of everything in it). It really is a peak time for many artists, Jim Morrison fanatics and otherwise, which results in possibly my least obscure list ever, because there's so much stuff I already loved that's already popular. I could have probably put together a decent list without researching, but here we are anyway.

chats: https://us21.chatzy.com/61009173008961
tunes: http://myradiostream.com/station/flashplayer.php?s=s6&p=14748
100. Massive Attack - Risingson

When I was doing 1998, I felt like I had a spot sewn up in my 1997 list because the lead single to "Mezzanine" was released as a single in the prior year, even if it's not really a song that you'd expect to be a lead single. When it came down to it, the song nearly missed my final list because it proved tougher than expected, saved by my inability to validate the list sooner. It's a rather mechanical song, like a cold, dark factory. Dream on.

Past entries:
1998Teardrop#8
1998Angel#34
1998Inertia Creeps#58
1998Group Four#88
2010Paradise Circus (feat Hope Sandoval)#91
2016The Spoils (feat Hope Sandoval)#39

99. Jean-Michel Jarre - Oxygene, Pt. 10

Very successful in Europe, French producer Jean-Michel Jarre had huge success in the 1970s with his "Oxygene" album, comprised of 6 tracks by the same name. Much like Meat Loaf and Mike Oldfield, he much later made a sequel to somewhat less success. I haven't heard that first album yet but I was intrigued by the audacity of having all these similarly named tracks ending up on my playlist, and I ended up enjoying them a decent amount. Part 10 here has a real sci-fi vibe to it, kind of like The X-Files Theme. Lush, but with no shortage of colourful sounds poking through.

98. Portishead - Only You

Only a year beyond "Endtroducing" and it feels like its impact is already being felt. I thought this might be the work of DJ Shadow due to the sampling but it is in fact all done in house by Portishead. Much like the Yazoo song, "Only You" proves to be an especially provocative calling phrase. It's probably why it was made a single considering that the song is relatively mellow outside of the vocals.

Past entries:
2008The Rip#9
2008Machine Gun#16

97. Veruca Salt - Volcano Girls

This is one of those rare instances where a clearly triple j favoured band made the ARIA top 50 but not the Hottest 100 so I didn't really know this song at all. Then again maybe the song just didn't have quite the same edge as "Seether" did a few years before. I was a little sceptical. To be honest it does skirt the line on being bland radio rock but there's enough energy to bring it over the line. The opening vocal hook in particular clicks with me in a way that the actual chorus doesn't quite reach.

96. Backstreet Boys - Everybody (Backstreet's Back)

I've never seen the film "This Is The End" but I feel as though it's helped contribute to renewed popularity for this song. I know this because my actual experience with it comes via Twitch Plays Pokemon, which if you were invested in at the time was an absolute goldmine of lore, memes, and general tomfoolery as everyone went above and beyond to personify the result of collective chaos. One such was someone editing the ending scene of the film with several 'characters' having their heads pasted over the Backstreet Boys as they perform this very song. I've always had a bit of a soft spot for it before that but now whenever I hear it I think of a video with only like 5,000 views and it fills me with joy. I always forget how much I knew this as a kid, because I can only feel confident that I was old enough to hear "Larger Than Life", and that song is so similar that I can't say for sure I wasn't just hearing both of them (happened to me with "Business" & "Without Me" a few years later after all). Still the appeal is pretty obvious, the absolutely shameless amount of faith put into the word 'everybawdi' reliably gets me energised.

95. Da Hool - Meet Her At the Loveparade

If I've ever made a reputation for liking this song, I'd just like to note that I didn't expect it to ever make my list, as it struck me as a sort of #150 finisher. After all, it's not a song with many tricks up its sleeve, resting on a single synth riff and hoping it still sounds exciting every time it returns. In that sense, it reminds me of my main problem with a lot of late '90s popular dance music which constantly runs on not quite enough ideas to feel fully fleshed out. So I can't really properly elaborate on this one but it just works for me.

94. The Chemical Brothers - Block Rockin' Beats

This song does an impressive feat by way of taking a vocal sample and turning it into an effective mantra for the song and band itself. This not being a lead single feels like a missed opportunity. Nonetheless, I cannot think of a more appropriate assortment of sounds to follow the titular phrase.

Past entries:
1999Hey Boy Hey Girl#94
2002Star Guitar#35
2002Come With Us#71
2004Galvanize (feat Q-Tip)#25

93. Grinspoon - Just Ace

Since we're in 1997, we're well entrenched in the world of songs I cannot remember not existing. "Just Ace" wasn't quite as flashy about that as other songs, but I've definitely gone through two lines of firstly 'oh yeah this song' and 'oh wow this is Grinspoon'. It feels like it's tapping into the big success Spiderbait managed with a song being under 2 minutes with a memorable riff. I'd also say this is another song whose title perfectly personifies the mood it encapsulates.

Past entries:
1999Ready 1#99
2007Black Tattoo#97

92. The Whitlams - Charlie No. 3

The Whitlams' "Eternap Nightcap" contains its famous Charlie trilogy, detailing a falling out with a former band member with a dour ending note. It's basically the song form of one of my favourite narrative techniques involving telling a story not quite in order to intensify the emotional impact of certain reveals. Or it would work better if I was familiar with the songs in the intended order, and was good at following lyrics in the first place. It's quite evocative as a downer, it makes you long for better times encapsulated in song, perhaps...

Past entries:
2002Fall For You#87

91. Aqua - Turn Back Time

Everything about this song fascinates me. It's already a quite unusual turn for Aqua to go from "Barbie Girl" and "Doctor Jones" into a ballad, and another downer of a ballad too. But it's not just that because it's a surprisingly creative one at that. You hear teases of it in the instrumentation as the song goes along, leading to the big shift in the bridge where it starts to sound like trip-hop with further tension provided in the vocals. There's nothing I can be cynical about here, it just sounds really well crafted.
90. BONNIE PINK - It's Gonna Rain!

I assume I have to thank the weeb portion of RateYourMusic for this one because it turns out that this was at one point an ending theme for an anime I'm not aware of, Rurouni Kenshin. For me it serves as a reminder of just how diverse the Japanese music scene is, because it's hard to pin down a style with this song. Bonnie's vocal melodies are the star of the show, playfully bouncing around a loose instrumental.

89. Radiohead - Airbag

This is track 1 on Radiohead's rather good 3rd album "OK Computer". Continuing on from the success of their previous album "The Bends", "OK Computer" debuted at #7 in Australian and proved very popular with triple j listeners voting it their #1 album of 1997, even beating Regurgitator's hotly tipped "Unit".

Past entries:
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93

88. Goldfinger - Superman

True '90s kids know only the first 2 minutes of this song and no more, but that's still enough time to collect SKATE and get the Pro Score of 50,000 points. There's no shortage of bangers on the Tony Hawk soundtracks, but this song more than anything else gets propped up in relation to it. I think maybe because 3rd wave ska's brief burst of insane popularity is similar to that of skateboarding video games and there just so happens to be a succinct way to pair the two together.

87. Grandaddy - Everything Beautiful Is Far Away

Grandaddy don't get an especially significant amount of credit for what they were doing in their prime, maybe because they lack the big song to elevate their career. Their most played song on Spotify is from this album but it strikes me as more of a playlist filler than a song people really go out of their way to listen to. I'm culpible in this assessment also though because this is their first time getting into my list. Mainly it's here for the chorus break, which really struck me as just a beautiful piece of music from the first time I heard it.

86. The Whitlams - Buy Now Pay Later (Charlie No. 2)

...except if you were hoping for this to be a cathartic pay off to the previous Whitlams entry than I'm sorry to say that this one is a downer too. Probably the most well known of the 3, detailing Charlie's descent due to addiction. It's quite a drastic shift just from the opening lyric: 'Charlie you're not my Charlie anymore, you're screwing it up'. The whole song maintains that sort of condescending dismissal, but there's also some self-reflection in admitting more should have been done to help.

Past entries:
1997Charlie No. 3#92
2002Fall For You#87

85. Jebediah - Benedict

I know too many Bens in my life to not get at least a little amusement at the mindless yelling of 'BEN! BEN! BEN!' towards the end. It's always been one of my favourite Jebediah tracks for all its creative flair. Melodies shifting into different melodies, peaking for me with the intense guitar solo on the bridge.

Past entries:
1999Animal#9

84. Ragga & The Jack Magic Orchestra - Where Are They Now

This song has a grand total of 1,205 plays on Spotify so I'm not even sure how it ended up on my radar for this. Maybe it had a single on RYM but if it did, it's since been deleted. Nonetheless, it's a curious fusion of trip-hop and chamber pop with huge vocals and sinister strings.

83. Rakim - It's Been a Long Time

My introduction to Rakim was when "Paid In Full" made its way onto a SingStar game though I never committed it to memory because rapping was weird in that game and I wasn't familiar enough with the song to want to get over that hurdle. His post '80s material doesn't seem to register much interest in many, but this song connected with me. It's the sort of scratch/sample based song that sounds timeless and could be released in any era.

82. Allure (feat 112) - All Cried Out

This song reminds me a lot of "Holding Out For A Hero" but I'm not sure which one I knew first and thus, which one is leeching off of the other's appeal, let's pretend it's a mix of both. As may become evident in future editions of this list, I'm very much one for this sort of big, dramatic R&B ballad. It has a similar sort of tension lift/release as a massive EDM drop. 112 are a little in the way but they're fine.

81. Grandaddy - Summer Here Kids

This is not quite as elegant as their prior entry, but it's a bit more on brand with rock music in later year's I'd go on to like. The first 20 seconds basically could pass for an Arcade Fire song. After that it's just relentless energy for most of the way.

Past entries:
1997Everything Beautiful Is Far Away#87
80. Mogwai - Mogwai Fear Satan

Post-rock is difficult in every way when making these lists. They're way too long to casually listen to, they're way too difficult to determine how much I like them because I'm rarely familiar in the first place, and then it's a question of how you weigh up 16 minutes of music when you're used to weighing up 4 minutes. Then how do you write about them when it's basically just 16 minutes of brooding instrumentals. It's why I don't know what I think about Mogwai because it's impossible for me to remember any of their songs, even this one which I can characterise as been remarkably consistent in what it's doing. It doesn't even have the big crescendos of a Godspeed song, it's just well, 16 minutes of this.

79. Cibo Matto - Spoon

I first heard this song the same time I heard "Sci-Fi Wasabi", only this one turned out to be a lot older so it took quite a while before I got to evaluate it even though I already knew I liked it a lot. The two are easy to compare because they're both about food and both have insanely catchy hooks. I probably like "Sci-Fi Wasabi" more but this got more of a chance to grow on me so it ends up higher on the list. Again it's just playful and fun.

Past entries:
1999Sci-Fi Wasabi#88

78. Gala - Let A Boy Cry

Gala is best known for her song "Freed From Desire" (from 1996) which didn't really make waves in Australia but was a massive hit in Europe. I don't think I knew that at all when I listened to both of those songs was more random songs I'd never heard of. No comment on the former song just yet but I really did gravitate to the follow up single which I think gives her a bit more space to breathe as a performer. As fun as the music is, it's the tone of her singing that really provides the hook here.

77. Ween - Ocean Man

It is in fact, the meme song. Kind of a weird one where it feels like it's a cult of personality just for the song to start playing, helped by how immediate the intro is, like how you only need to play the first 4 notes of "MEGALOVANIA" to trip people over. "Ocean Man" is of course famous belatedly because it featured in the SpongeBob SquarePants movie, which was no coincidence because Stephen Hillenburg was a big fan and was inspired by this very album to make the TV series in the first place. "The Mollusk" is Ween's best regarded album, perhaps helped as it actually does mostly stick to its vibe if you ignore the fact that "Wavin' My Dick In The Wind" is also on it. That's not to say Ween's eclecticism isn't what makes them great, because it is, but I really enjoy listening to the album front to back. Because of how much I've heard the song outside of the album, this song that absolutely embodies the style of the album ends up being the most jarring moment. Like, you get a spot on '70s Bowie pastische...and then "Ocean Man". Either way though it's great.

76. Ben Folds Five - Battle of Who Could Care Less

As much as I like this song as a juvenile response image when the top 2 songs on the chart aren't very interesting to me, I also like the song itself. I think I was groomed to like it long before I heard it, because I always heard it mentioned alongside Ben Folds Five songs I was familiar with, where this one assumably just slipped through the cracks as one of their bigger singles that didn't make a Hottest 100. That and it had a cool title. Given its lyrics about general apathy, it may as well be just a better version of "The Lazy Song".

Past entries:
1999Army#5

75. Björk - Bachelorette

Just a regular reminder that Björk is wonderful and we don't deserve her. "Homogenic" proved a wonderful listen with "Bachelorette" as one of many highlights. Like many of her best songs, it's all about grandness and swapping between the sharp & soft vocal tones that I can hear just from writing this.

Past entries:
2001It's Not Up To You#37
2001Hidden Place#63
2001Pagan Poetry#75

74. Three 6 Mafia - Tear da Club Up '97

I always enjoy when Three 6 Mafia come up on my radar for this because they're always just so much fun. I'm not sure if there's any song in particular that should have gotten them into this list before, but "Tear da Club Up '97" just distills what I need on its own.

73. Mariah Carey - The Roof

I'm not saying that this song is only in this list because I really do like "Shook Ones Pt. II" that much, but it does help and also we'll cross that bridge when we get there. I really did enjoy the singles I heard from "Butterfly" though, but this one stood out the most to me. It's really something quite different, with Mariah's breathy tones riding well over the classic instrumental loop.

Past entries:
2002I Know What You Want (with Busta Rhymes)#32
2005We Belong Together#51

72. Ammonia - You're Not the Only One Who Feels This Way

"Drugs" tends to be more popular, but I've always found this comically long title as especially cathartic. It reminds me a bit of British India's "I Can Make You Love Me" where it spends most of its chorus focusing on a single phrase, and hammering it into submission.

71. Radiohead - Lucky

This is track 11 on Radiohead's...no but seriously I'll try. This is one of a few songs I've kind of cheated with on this list because it was released before 1997 on a compilation before eventually ending up on "OK Computer". I think though it shows how much the band matured following the first two albums, which probably would have focused more on loud thrashing to suffice as hooks. This song is much more eloquent about its smashing of instruments together.

Past entries:
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93
70. Kylie Minogue - Some Kind of Bliss

I continue to be painfully aware of how on brand I am but I really like "Impossible Princess". It's unfortunate I can't quite fit any other songs on this list as there are a lot of contenders. "Some Kind Of Bliss" taps into a good blend of familiar & fresh that might help it as a contender for me. Nonetheless, despite the record's reputation, "Some Kind Of Bliss" has one of Kylie's best pop hooks.

Past entries:
2001In Your Eyes#29
2001Come Into My World#96
2001Can't Get You Out Of My Head#98
2003Red Blooded Woman#44

69. Godspeed You! Black Emperor - East Hastings

Actually I wouldn't mind having more entries from this album as well because it really was a worthwhile listen, although on the other hand, keeping it at one makes things easier to put things together. This is kind of a cheat entry again because it's based on the tracklisting of the CD version of the album, which didn't technically emerge until a year later, but it's a frustrating effort to backwards correct things. "East Hastings" teases what's to come on the next album, the 12th minute climax sounds straight out of it.

Past entries:
2000Sleep#3
2000Static#16
2000Storm#31
2000Like Antennas To Heaven...#94
2002rockets fall on Rocket Falls#15

68. Radiohead - Climbing Up the Walls

This song could easily blend into the rest of the tracklisting for "OK Computer" except just a slight filter on it makes it sound absolutely terrifying. It's not all for show though, as the veil allows for a more organic blend into the chaotic finish.

Past entries:
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93

67. Blur - Song 2

I often wonder about whether I'd like this song more, or less if it was produced a bit crisply. At times it bugs me, but it also feels essential to the song's brand. The song's appeal comes from how brazen and classless it sounds, and to a lesser extent how much it juxtaposes Blur's career additionally. There's also a false narrative that pegs this song as a parody of grunge that of course never makes sense because imagine doing that in 1997. It's like if 10 years from now, people start calling "ME!" a scathing parody of Glee. There are worse ways to get distilled frenzy in the space of 2 minutes and 2 seconds.

Past entries:
1999Coffee & TV#4
1999Tender#82
2010Fool's Day#60

66. Ben Folds Five - Brick

Constantly left off Christmas playlists, this extremely delicate song that Kanye dropped back in 1997 is hard to talk about and certainly not something to make jokes about. It is a touch overplayed but it's hard to deny its beauty.

Past entries:
1997Battle Of Who Could Care Less#76
1999Army#5

65. The Superjesus - Down Again

Like I'm pretty sure I mentioned in last year's list, The Superjesus continue to prove especially good at weaving strong melodic flair into their post-grunge stylings, something that sometimes goes amiss behind sounding loud. This song cascades the melodies, where it's not really clear when you've actually hit the song's hook.

Past entries:
1998Now & Then#40
1998Ashes#73

64. Portishead - Seven Months

Shout out to the barking dog sample. Otherwise this works the same way many other Portishead songs do, with shrill vocals atop processed drums. Perhaps not the best example of it they've done, but the big hook does work to provide shivers.

Past entries:
1997Only You#98
2008The Rip#9
2008Machine Gun#16

63. Regurgitator - Everyday Formula

Regurgitator's hotly tipped "Unit" has a reputation for being the album where the band veered away from rock to synth pop, something the band contributed to themselves with both the original and remix of "I Like Your Old Stuff Better Than Your New Stuff". I feel as though the argument doesn't especially hold water if you listen beyond just the singles, and then even if you do stick to the singles, you have to remember that the first one was this, an out-and-out rocker that would fit just fine on the previous album.

Past entries:
2001Fat Cop#25

62. Radiohead - The Tourist

I feel as though I underrated this song before I made this list. It's the final track on the album and I probably treated it as an extended coda, but mainly I think it's because the title doesn't recall any obvious hooks. Certainly it makes sense as a closer, but it's not just phoned in either, as it still sounds just as intricately layered as everything else.

Past entries:
1997Climbing Up The Walls#68
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93

61. Jebediah - Leaving Home

This was my introduction to Jebediah I believe. It stuck out to me as a catchy track and I didn't even call to question Kevin Mitchell's egregious accent. That assessment pretty much stays true today. It's surprising that for as much as the song is remembered for the thrashing chorus, it's surprisingly mellow for the most part.

Past entries:
1997Benedict#85
1999Animal#9
60. The Sundays - Summertime

One of the closest things to dream pop that have ever made the ARIA top 50, it makes sense that it'll turn up here. It's remarkably breezy, like a warm hug set to music. Despite the trappings of the aforementioned genre, it doesn't just rest on the vibe, and Harriet's vocals stand out strongly. The band did split up shortly after this album was released, so I guess you could say here's where the story ends.

59. Third Eye Blind - Semi-Charmed Life

This song was probably produced in a lab to make the catchiest song ever written. Though honestly, Third Eye Blind clearly had a knack for writing songs that stuck. Their self-titled album has so many big songs on it that it feels wrong that they only had one top 50 single in Australia ("Losing A Whole Year" was close to making this list too). Also crystal meth.

58. Harvey Danger - Flagpole Sitta

I never really watched much of Peep Show but I did instead watch a lot of That Mitchell & Webb Look which may as well be the same thing. I did however see the start of the show a lot, which is how I came across this song. The most important thing is what an absolutely massive tune.

57. O.C. - My World

When I first listened to this, I thought it sounded a lot like Gang Starr...and rightly so because DJ Premier produced it. I think there's also a Tribe reference in here so the pedigree for me is strong. I don't know much about O.C. himself but one must respect someone who will go so far as to interrupt their own chorus to deliver another verse.

56. Faith No More - Ashes To Ashes

This single is noteworthy for being the big hit song that convinced enough people to buy "Album Of The Year" and give Faith No More their only #1 album, even if it's not a particularly well liked one. I guess it might still be a better outcome than for all the people who bought "Angel Dust" on the back of "Easy". For a big sounding song, its best hook is surprisingly the guitar tones on the verses, which hint at an intensity that doesn't really arrive in that way.

55. Janet Jackson - Together Again

When I was younger, I wasn't very much into this song because it sounded to me like the exact simulacra of what pop music sounded like, and thus it felt uninspired. I have just a slightly better perspective to say that this really is far more unique than that. It was however inspired by a 1996 single from the Logo hero himself, Kenny "Dope". There's nothing perfunctory about this though, as the sweet sentiment is matched by an always welcoming hook.

54. Radiohead - Let Down

I feel like my most controversial Radiohead opinion is that I've never connected to "Let Down" as much as most. The fact that I can say this about a song that is well entrenched on my list just shows the extent to which this song is beloved. It's certainly a pretty song though, with some nice gradual builds and releases.

Past entries:
1997The Tourist#62
1997Climbing Up The Walls#68
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93

53. Built to Spill - Stop the Show

I characterise what I know about 2nd wave emo (or thereabouts) is not really something that immediate catchiness comes to mind, as it's often more brooding in a way that can potentially creep up on multiple listens. Not that Built To Spill really are an emo band but they embody some characteristics of the sound. My point is that I was surprised at just how quickly I latched onto a lot of "Perfect From Now On". "Stop The Show" is characterised for me in its sharp transitions which prove to be the most engaging moments. What I'm basically trying to say is that this song is the "SICKO MODE" of 1997.

52. Portishead - Elysium

What? *Previous Portishead song* is evolving! Wow! It evolved into "Elysium". Though as much as the form is the same, I feel like this song strikes less like the other entries and more akin to "Glory Box" with its defiant hook. There's also a trick Muse would take 6 years later, delving into a more classical sounding piece in the middle of the song.

Past entries:
1997Seven Months#64
1997Only You#98
2008The Rip#9
2008Machine Gun#16

51. The Verve - Bitter Sweet Symphony

I can't remember why but I think growing up I imagined The Verve as a bit naff and that this was a common opinion. I suppose I have to thank to overwhelming love that this song continues to receive for giving it more of a chance. It is a song that is so obscenely overplayed that it became hard to actually look at what it's doing for a long time. Nowadays I find myself fascinated by the fact that the song starts on such a brilliantly existential opening set of lyrics, before diving far away from that intrigue the rest of the way. That's okay though, because the song as it's composed is compelling enough anyway. Doing what many club records have done before and since, and taking a distinct sample and integrating it so well into the composition that the repetition doesn't grate, and it feels like it belongs there naturally. As an added bonus, The Verve are finally getting money for this song as of earlier this year!
50. Radiohead - No Surprises

I find the video for this more memorable than the song itself, Radiohead are actually surprisingly good at bringing out uniquely captivating videos for so much of their career. It feels like this song was made to be the breakout single from the album as it's the least overbearing, with a lullaby of a melody to coax people in. When I was younger, I used to sing 'no a la la larms', which isn't remotely pronounced, but I think I never heard the proper word over myself to realise it was wrong.

Past entries:
1997Let Down#54
1997The Tourist#62
1997Climbing Up The Walls#68
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93
49. The Mighty Mighty Bosstones - The Impression That I Get

Arguably the most iconic 3rd wave ska song. Though I suppose No Doubt had some bigger hits, none of them quite embody the style with quite the brashness of this song. Every element of this is working as hard as possible to be over the top and it all comes together into this ridiculous ball of fun. Just don't forget that there is 100% a comma in the chorus, it is in fact not a song about never needing to knock on wood.
48. Supergrass - Richard III

Just like Pulp, Supergrass are nowadays best known for one song in particular, which was a UK #2 hit. Just like Pulp, Supergrass had another song reach #2 in the UK which is nowhere near as well known. Sadly in Supergrass's case, they were blocked by an incumbent R. Kelly song stopping "Richard III" from hitting the top spot. I basically only discovered it because of its impressive chart standing, and was really impressed something like this could make such a big splash. Supergrass are a band I've been fond of for quite a while, and every time I reach one of their albums for this, there's always at least something interesting they're doing to stand out a little from the pack. This song is just their most pure belter. Perhaps it reminds me of Arctic Monkeys' #2 hit "Brianstorm" a little, both have a sort of accelerating throttle to their riffs.
47. Cordrazine - Crazy

This song being in this list is me cheating a little bit. Cordrazine did in fact release "Crazy" in 1997 on an EP, which did remarkably well for them in that year's Hottest 100. In 1998 they released an album and broke up shortly after, but I wasn't aware of anything going on so I bought the album version of this song to first hear it. I was really impressed by its jazzy take on rock which came a few years before Radiohead's similar "Life In A Glasshouse", but that version is quite a bit different to the EP version that I think most people know. But these differences became my favourite thing about this song and so I stick by that version even though I'm kind of cheating by putting it in here (then again, it's similar to "Mr. Brightside" being referred to as a 2003 song when everyone listens to the album version as well). I did end up listening to the whole EP and found a bit of quality in it, but nothing grabs me quite like the erratic wailing of this rendition.
46. Sleater-Kinney - One More Hour

It's been a long journey but Sleater-Kinney are finally in the top half of my list. They must be credited for being here though, as they're the only artist on this list to have made my weekly personal chart in 2019. I'm much more fond of their 1997 material, which feels like a perfect encapsulation of the prickly indie rock I've been seeing in their successive entries here. The interplay of lead & backing vocals in the chorus on this song are remarkably effective as a hook, it sounds quite unlike anything else, and it kept me coming back to this song.

Past entries:
1999Get Up#60
2002Far Away#75
2005Jumpers#76
2015No Anthems#72
45. Built to Spill - Randy Described Eternity

This opening track on "Perfect From Now On" is a more balanced affair where the intricate layers are much more prominent. The song's outro is an extended instrumental affair which features wonderful oscillation and general chaos coming together quite nicely.

Past entries:
1997Stop The Show#53
44. Diddy (feat The Notorious B.I.G. & Busta Rhymes) - Victory

I don't think very highly of "No Way Out" by Puff Daddy & The Family. Part of this is with the benefit of hindsight, as the album spearheaded an entire era of hip-hop focused on utter flagrance. But also mainly because Diddy had his one trick of relying far too much on cheesy samples to get people past the fact that he wasn't ever a very compelling rapper. "Been Around The World" I think works for me as a fun flip, but I really don't want to hear "The Message" but with Ma$e instead of Melle Mel. The one song in particular I think that strikes a success is "Victory" which I was attuned to because it featured on one of the NBA games my brother played a lot. The beat which is of course another sample, does a lot of legwork to up the intensity to the point that even I can admit Diddy rides it pretty well. Biggy & Busta are the real stars though, the latter providing a monster of a hook, and the former just oozing in his usual swagger. The only real negative is the unfortunate f-bomb which I suppose is a product of its time.

Past entries (The Notorious B.I.G.):
2015Old Thing Back (with Matoma)#39

Past entries (Busta Rhymes):
1998Gimme Some More#57
2002I Know What You Want (with Mariah Carey)#32
2013Thank You (feat Q-Tip, Kanye West & Lil Wayne)#14
2016Dis Generation (with A Tribe Called Quest)#19
43. Blur - Beetlebum

Most people would struggle to pick out Blur's 2 UK #1 hits without looking them up. Heck, if you named a dozen songs of theirs you might not even come to "Beetlebum", whose success basically lived on the fact that it was the lead single to the band's self-titled album. But it's always been a favourite of mine for its absolutely garish guitar tone. It sounds like they're hitting the brown note it goes down that low. Certainly though it's something unusual in a #1 hit.

Past entries:
1997Song 2#67
1999Coffee & TV#4
1999Tender#82
2010Fool's Day#60
42. Fishmans - Walking In The Rhythm

I'm glad that I started things on the tail end of Fishmans' career with such a strong impression so I don't feel like I'm missing out on anything here. Their album "宇宙 日本 世田谷" actually had a lot of highlights I couldn't quite fit on this list, but "Walking In The Rhythm" encapsulates the vibe enough just on its own. Yes, it's more Japanese dub, which is not something I would have thought would catch my interest, but it's so effortlessly graceful and beautiful, never feeling as long as it actually is.

Past entries:
1998ゆらめき IN THE AIR#26

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41. Portishead - Cowboys

This song continues to do the thing that Portishead do that I like to increasingly strong results. In all seriousness it does have one of the most engaging hooks on the album, and instrumentally it's considerably more dense than usual. It's the sort of song you can just skip to any random moment and the immediate gratification that comes with hearing something you like.

Past entries:
1997Elysium#52
1997Seven Months#64
1997Only You#98
2008The Rip#9
2008Machine Gun#16
40. The Notorious B.I.G. - Kick In the Door

If you are extremely in depth with knowledge of my lists, or alternatively familiar with The Notorious B.I.G.'s 2nd album, then you may recognise this title. Yes, in "Last Real Ni**a Alive" Nas mentions this song directly with the weirdest flex of bragging that Biggie made a diss track for him. Yes, believe it or not, he was not actually talking about Skunkhour's best Hottest 100 entry. I feel like this is the sort of song people think of when they mythologise diss tracks in hip-hop, because this gets it all right. It's not hard to do well with a beat this fun.

Past entries:
1997Victory (with Diddy)#44
2015Old Thing Back (with Matoma)#39
39. Sleater-Kinney - Dig Me Out

I had some trouble separating these two Sleater-Kinney songs because while they are in ways similar, they excel in different ways. "One More Hour" has the more striking hook, but this is just a fully fleshed out experience where everything flows naturally. The chorus into post-chorus transition is so good.

Past entries:
1997One More Hour#47
1999Get Up#60
2002Far Away#75
2005Jumpers#76
2015No Anthems#72
38. The Smashing Pumpkins - The End Is the Beginning Is the End

Trying to guess The Smashing Pumpkins' highest charting single without having already studied the charts is a fool's errand. As had been already seen with U2 & Seal, Batman soundtracks are a serious boon, and The Smashing Pumpkins were also riding a career high. I feel this song doesn't get discussed a lot, but I feel it's one of the group's stickiest choruses. I already mentioned the closest thing to dream pop as a top 50 hit earlier, and this could be one of the closest things to shoegaze. I live for this brooding stuff.

Past entries:
1998Ava Adore#61
2007Tarantula#31
37. Leonardo's Bride - Even When I'm Sleeping

This couldn't be any more different. I associate this along with another song later on this list for the fact that it seems like something that should be a Hottest 100 entry, but isn't, and as thus has been left unappraised and also not in my iTunes library until now. Otherwise I'm not sure what more can be said on this song. Kind of like Frente!'s cover of "Bizarre Love Triangle", it transcends its form with such an engaging performance that it gets away with being so stripped back where others might languish as bores. The song fits in its chorus two immensely captivating hooks, where many artists would be lucky to even come across one this good.
36. Camp Lo - Black Nostaljack AKA Come On

This song is such a perfect follow up, where it doesn't have an easy task at all. Perhaps it's easy to just ignore it in favour of Camp Lo's other song (which I strongly suspect will be in my next list), but it has its own personality. What a groove, what a hook, just great vibes really.
35. IAM (feat Timbo King, Dreddy Krueger & Prodigal Sunn) - La saga

IAM's album "L'école du micro d'argent" seems to be highly regarded in the specific niche of French hip-hop. It seems to draw a lot of comparisons in style and presentation to Wu-Tang Clan, so this seems like a fitting meeting point. I actually thought there were several Wu-Tang members on this song but rather it seems to be several affliated rappers, at least one of which sounds a decent amount like Raekwon.
34. Elliott Smith - Pictures of Me

I put myself through the torment of listening to so many Elliott Smith songs, a constant downer in general, because the proof is in just how many times he's wound up on these lists. "Pictures Of Me" was the easiest song to gravitate to on "Either/Or", with one of his most pleasant sounding hooks. It's just reliably solid indie rock in general.

Past entries:
1998Waltz #2 (XO)#13
1998Independence Day#52
1998Sweet Adeline#70
1998Baby Britan#93
2000Son Of Sam#41
2004Memory Lane#49
33. Cornershop - Brimful of Asha (Norman Cook Remix)

Well I missed 45 but at least I basically landed on the 2nd most prominent RPM. This song's hook hints at the general notion, but the whole thing captures one of my favourite ways to endear a song to me. Put simply, it's a song expressing joy that's brought about from music itself, which in a world where so many music fans are perpetually angry assholes, is a nice reminder of why I try to learn to put up with them. This is obviously the remix which speeds it up and renders the original a bit more difficult to listen to even if I respect it a lot.
32. Foo Fighters - My Hero

It's not uncommon to see Foo Fighters discarded as boring radio rock, something I can't really counter even if I like a lot of their stuff. A lot of their more noteworthy examples are songs that I don't care much for either. I often wonder if this song gets caught up in that as well just because it is one of their slower and more overplayed songs. I can't do it to "My Hero" though, which totally justifies its existence with just how much extra effort everyone's going into on it. It delivers the sentiment with plenty of heartwarming gusto.

Past entries:
1999Generator#6
1999Stacked Actors#81
2002All My Life#24
2002Low#89
2005No Way Back#66
2007The Pretender#41
2011Bridge Burning#28
2011Rope#40
31. Built to Spill - I Would Hurt a Fly

While Built To Spill's songs here have been rather long and not conforming to usual songwriting form, this song actually has a verse-chorus format which peaks really effectively. The delivery on 'won't' just slams everything into place.

Past entries:
1997Randy Described Eternity#45
1997Stop The Show#53
30. IAM - L'empire du côté obscur

This is just obviously here as a bait and switch to briefly trick everyone into thinking I only was here for the song that was watered down for me by way of largely being in English. In truth "La saga" did stick out to me first, but this song feels more like a comfortable wheelhouse for the group. I only know one rude French word so I don't know anything they're saying here though I suspect something is obscure, but French as a language is so malleable to make for addictive flows.

Past entries:
1997La saga (feat Timbo King, Dreddy Krueger & Prodigal Sunn)#35
29. The Prodigy - Smack My Bitch Up

Shortly before I started making this list, Keith Flint passed away, and though it would be lovely to properly memorialise him in this list, his two most famous contributions to The Prodigy's catalogue were technically released in 1996 so I'll get to them soon. It would have been fun to include "Serial Thrilla" which is basically a troll song for how much the intro sounds like your computer is freezing up. Instead we just have a Kool Keith vocal sample on this song. I did not realise I liked it as much as I do, but this just holds up remarkably well with its frantic instrumental. The title is obviously garish on purpose, but I think it's a logical step when most of the people who don't like it weren't going to like the final product anyway. It's the same reason SoundCloud rappers have names that seem solely done to piss off older music fans.

Past entries:
2009Warrior's Dance#98
28. Foo Fighters - Monkey Wrench

If "My Hero" is too slow, then fortunately it shares space on the same album as one of the Foo Fighters' most engaging rockers. It almost feels like it's so defining for the sound of late '90s alternative rock that it begins to be perfunctory, but then I listen to it again and realise just how well it does said job.

Past entries:
1997My Hero#32
1999Generator#6
1999Stacked Actors#81
2002All My Life#24
2002Low#89
2005No Way Back#66
2007The Pretender#41
2011Bridge Burning#28
2011Rope#40
27. Delerium (feat Sarah McLachlan) - Silence

The odd thing about mentioning this song is that it brings to mind totally different perspectives because it's known in multiple different versions, so when you see this title you might envision something different into your head than I do, just based on our perspectives. I think most people prefer the remix but I find that it removes some of the elements in the chorus that I find most compelling, so my go-to is the album version. Out of context, Sarah McLachlan is a surprising vocalist to turn up on this, but her higher tones are a great fit to build the mystery with this song.
26. Björk - All Is Full of Love

This is a major cheat on my list yet again. I regularly put songs aside when they end up on my radar with belated single releases, so I did see this song when I was making my 1999 list and shoved it under 1997. This was not at all correct because if you're familiar with Björk's "Homogenic", you'll know that the album version is quite a bit different. "All Is Full Of Love" is best known by the single version, which wasn't actually newly recorded for then, but was the original version Björk composed, so perhaps it could have existed sounding like this in 1997. It's largely best known in this version because of the incredible music video, but this also is far more effective in capturing Björk's appeal as an artist. It's all large emotions and beautiful compositions.

Past entries:
1997Bachelorette#75
2001It's Not Up To You#37
2001Hidden Place#63
2001Pagan Poetry#75
25. The Whitlams - No Aphrodisiac

Famously the beautiful ballad that hit #1 on the Hottest 100 in 1997 is clearly about jerking off. The song was popular enough that The Whitlams ended up taking a key lyric for that in the name of their Greatest Hits album. But to dismiss the song's form like that is to do it a disservice. Outside of that, it's a song that doesn't just stay on one note but gets surprisingly aggressive. Not the most aggressive piano rock in 1997, but it feels so weird in this song that I wonder if that's why it was a tough sell on commercial radio. It looks weird in hindsight that this wasn't a top 50 hit, but maybe it made perfect sense back then.

Past entries:
1997Buy Now Pay Later (Charlie No. 2)#86
1997Charlie No. 3#92
2002Fall For You#87
24. The Whitlams - You Sound Like Louis Burdett

Famously the jaunty Whitlams track which also featured in the Hottest 100 that clearly mentions jerking off in the lyrics. This is probably the best way to put back to back songs by the same artist on the list because they don't sound very much alike. The idea of the titular phrase as a cutting insult grows on me more over time as I am always strongly interested that manner of absurdism (what I'm saying is that it reminds me of the 'who's this clown?' tweet). As another song that I cannot remember not knowing, it always puts me in a good mood.

Past entries:
1997No Aphrodisiac#25
1997Buy Now Pay Later (Charlie No. 2)#86
1997Charlie No. 3#92
2002Fall For You#87
23. Radiohead - Electioneering

There are a lot of songs on "OK Computer" that could be described as graceful and "Electioneering" is not one of them. Because I'm dumb, it took me until that infamous QLVG round to realise that the titular term refers to politics and not electricity, the latter feeling apt given the loud guitar wailing for much of it.

Past entries:
1997No Surprises#50
1997Let Down#54
1997The Tourist#62
1997Climbing Up The Walls#68
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93
22. Ben Folds Five - Selfless, Cold and Composed

I listened to "Whatever and Ever Amen" because I always see people who grew up in this time worshipping this album and I was never sure if it was just mainly for the singles. Lo and behold though, this track really snuck up on me from it. It's some of the most fun piano work I've heard from Ben Folds without being flashy, while the added violins give it a touch of class, even if it's about a toxic relationship. Telling someone to punch you in the face because even that feeling would be an improvement on dejected nothingness never felt so lovely!

Past entries:
1997Brick#66
1997Battle Of Who Could Care Less#76
1999Army#5
21. The Whitlams - Melbourne

I wasn't looking at my old Hottest 100 rank when I made this list but I did afterwards and was amused to find that I put "No Aphrodisiac" a grand total of 2 places above "You Sound Like Louis Burdett", proving that some things don't change very much. On the other hand, they both trounced "Melbourne" by about 80 spots and that's the song that's having the last laugh. I tweeted about the 'one in a million' lyric from "Up Against The Wall" the other day, but another I love is in this song where he professes 'If I had 3 lives, I'd marry her in 2', the sort of considered hyperbole that is perhaps more believable than going full hog.

Past entries:
1997You Sound Like Louis Burdett#24
1997No Aphrodisiac#25
1997Buy Now Pay Later (Charlie No. 2)#86
1997Charlie No. 3#92
2002Fall For You#87
20. The Corrs - Only When I Sleep

I never know what to think about The Corrs. I think I don't always have a strong impression because some of their biggest hits are too overplayed and don't do much for me, but then I often realise that this could also apply to bands I know I like, and then I begin to wonder how much initial impression can cloud the overall state. Mainly because I do think The Corrs shouldn't be totally dismissed. I'm surprised I know this so well because my parents had the previous Corrs album and this wasn't a huge hit. Either way, this song just makes me think of Massive Music Quiz and how I lost my shit upon recognising this song from my childhood and then being shocked it was by The Corrs. The vocal layering on the chorus makes for a memorable hook (and they also flip it around a bit in later iterations, but there are a fair share of instrumental hooks as well. The lead into the chorus is "Creep"-esque with the menace of the guitar. Also because it's The Corrs, it has to have a tin whistle solo which fits surprisingly well against a post-grunge backing.
19. Future Bible Heroes - Lonely Days

This song basically gave birth to my 2012 in music. "Lonely Days" sounds like an amalgamation of Beach House, Melody's Echo Chamber & Choir Of Young Believers. Basically it couldn't be more in my wheelhouse if it tried, and I love the fact that something sounding like this existed in 1997. It comes with unexpected pedigree because this group is the work of Stephin Merritt from The Magnetic Fields, the vocalist also having worked with them a bit. The rattly instrument in particular sticks out to me, mixed in beautifully to bring so much clarity to the way it pokes in and out.
18. Ben Folds Five - One Angry Dwarf and 200 Solemn Faces

An absolutely petulant song and I can't get enough of it. Not to mention an extremely relatable song as someone who spent most of their schooling life as remarkably short, only to eventually overtake some people who felt like giants to me. The whole thing is so idiosyncratic that it's hard not to love. Like, not many would dare to try and work a hook and title around such an obtuse phrase, and yet it really does work. The inflection changes a bit on the final chorus and not much happens in the bridge before that, so what I'm basically saying is that this song should be spending 12 weeks and counting at #1 right now.

Past entries:
1997Selfless, Cold and Composed#22
1997Brick#66
1997Battle Of Who Could Care Less#76
1999Army#5
17. Regurgitator - ! (The Song Formerly Known As)

This seems to be the Regurgitator song that's regarded most fondly now, and I can't really question that fact. I'm always a little skeptical of whether this song is really a tribute to Prince or making fun of him, but I don't really know the musical socio-political climate to know for sure. Either way, as memorable as the title is, it's here because it's just a killer slice of electro-pop-rock. That's right!

Past entries:
1997Everyday Formula#63
2001Fat Cop#25
16. The Living End - Second Solution

It's hard not to feel like "Second Solution" never really gets a proper appraisal due to how readily it's overshadowed for obvious reasons. It's genuinely one of my favourite Living End songs in its own right though. You can see why they had the confidence in it to give it top billing. In a way, it's a perfect encapsulation of The Living End, where it fits a catchy hook that's more dark than the music lets on, while managing to fit in a killer guitar solo and an extended all out coda. It does all of that in under 3 minutes so it's easy to go back to.

Past entries:
1998All Torn Down#6
1998West End Riot#31
1998Save The Day#65
2000Pictures In The Mirror#81
2002One Said To The Other#26
2003End Of The World#15
2006Wake Up#79
2008Moment In The Sun#55
2008White Noise#80
2011Song For The Lonely#25
2011Machine Gun#90
15. Green Day - Hitchin' a Ride

This song feels like it's caught in a weird part of Green Day's discography where it sounds like it could've been a hit on "Dookie", but now feels out of place because of what's the biggest hit on "Nimrod" now. So while the former album is mythologised, this song gets left out of the conversation and that's a dang shame because it's one of the band's most succinct bangers. I love the personality in Billie Joe's delivery circa '90s Green Day and it carries this song in spades, which feels like the ride in question is some manic parade. By all means they can carry on.

Past entries:
2004Jesus Of Suburbia#27
2004American Idiot#38
14. Live - Lakini's Juice

Now to take a break from all these beloved '90s bands at the peak of their powers, I just also have always loved this particular song by Live. I associate it a bit with Stone Temple Pilots' "Interstate Love Song" in that they both remind me of Wario Land 2 for different reasons. This song is for the obvious crunchy guitar hook which reminds me of that level where you're falling down endlessly. But the song doesn't rest on the laurels of just that, because it's also filled with all sorts of random ideas. Like the dramatic swells, the strings, Ed Kowalczyk screaming out the hook with undeniable passion.
13. Bic Runga - Sway

In my head, this song reminds me of "Drive". I don't know if that's a particularly well qualified observation because it might just be a dopey observation from the fact that it just so happens to be from an album titled "Drive". Nonetheless, it shares the simple aesthetic to deliver a lovey-dovey sentiment with the occasional peculiar word choice. There's nice coupling of music and tone though, where the song is light and breezy until the pre-chorus reveals a hint of tension and it hits a sour tone, only to release that with the charmful bid on the chorus. Not many artists can re-record their own song in a different language and nearly break the ACI, what a star.

Past entries:
2002Get Some Sleep#93

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12. Spice Girls - Too Much

I remember really not liking the Spice Girls. When you grow up exposed to a gender binary that sees everything clearly marketed as 'for boys' or 'for girls', as well as a social set up where the two rarely intermingle (something I wonder if it was just a peer pressure thing in hindsight as there were girls I could be friends with by way of parental connections, but it never happened at school until I was a teenager) you get a stigma attached to the latter. It's the kind of dumb thing that I think inspires MRAs because a 5 year old me could work out that 'girl power' had to be at the expense of 'boy power' and thus was a black eye for me. Fortunately most of us grow out of that. Spice Girls were harder to approach still because their entire M.O still in essence felt like a counter to my ideals in music. It would take several years of occasional hearing that made me think 'oh that's catchy' or 'there's something in this' before I started to warm to them more. Though I still think they're not supposed to be for me, I've grown a lot of respect for them and find I like the vast majority of their noteworthy singles. "Too Much" is a bit of an odd pick I suppose, but in the context of a looker into the phenomenon, it makes sense that my favourite song of theirs seems arbitrary. It's a really cruisey song that I think doesn't really get much attention, so I'm not sure I even was aware of it at the time. Nonetheless, it's the sort of song that just oozes in nostalgia for this era for me. The tension in what the song is tackling is in a very personal place, and there's not much better as a way to consider childhood, than a lot of introspection about the world you're put in, and only identifying things as important if they're directly related to yourself. Not to say you're being rudely selfish, but you're just trying to get through everything that's been put in front of you instinctively. Even if it's not an ideal representation of what it was like, this song gives off the exact sort of warm, fuzzy vibes that come from recalling it.
11. The Offspring - Gone Away

I gravitated to this song pretty quickly as a big sounding rock anthem and nothing more. It has a big chugging riff that ends up making it sound a lot like "Mad World", and the verses don't run too long so you get to the big sing-along chorus. After all, I think it's pretty clear that lyrics are not my first instinct when listening to music. This song really does warrant that sort of attention. If you didn't know, it's written in response to Dexter's girlfriend dying in a car crash, and as soon as that's made part of the equation, it's suddenly unavoidable in the context of every single lyric. The big rock frontman wailing sounds like genuine wailing. The bargaining on the bridge, wanting to make a deal with God and get him to trade their places, it's so stunningly raw. I can't believe something so pained and sombre was just casually played every day on the radio back in the day.

Past entries:
1998The Kids Aren't Alright#7
10. Regurgitator - Black Bugs

There's just something about this song for me and I'm not entirely sure what. It's easy to say 'haha, it's a song about playing video games, of course I like it'. Maybe that is valid though, as someone who does all manner of mundane things over and over again because I'm addicted to the dopamine hit of achievements, hearing a song whose hook is an existential curiosity of what said pointless activity is striving towards is something I can get behind. Really though I think it's easier to say I get behind the song because it knocks and then some. I'm not about to say that this deserves to be more popular than "! (The Song Formerly Known As)", but for me, this just wraps up "Unit" in a nice little succinct package.

Past entries:
1997! (The Song Formerly Known As)#17
1997Everyday Formula#63
2001Fat Cop#25
9. Radiohead - Karma Police

I have a vivid memory of rushing out to my school's open night (I can't remember why tbh) and specifically, listening to music on my iPod (not much though, because it was only like a 10 minute trip). But mainly I remember listening to this song in particular, running across the pavement and being slightly terrified if any headlights came into view. Because once again, I feel like the music video really sells the aesthetic of this song for me. The transformative piano backing is so chilling though that the song is made so much better by listening to it at night, which is obviously why I put it so high up on this list. Still, it's the sound of a band in their absolute prime, where all the singles feel like monster events in hindsight even if the song comes attached with a layer of jokiness and severity that probably aren't supposed to gel together. It's one of my favourite songs to play on the piano because it's so easy to mimic the vocal melody and yet so satisfying to hear it come into place.

Past entries:
1997Electioneering#23
1997No Surprises#50
1997Let Down#54
1997The Tourist#62
1997Climbing Up The Walls#68
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93
8. Foo Fighters - Everlong

I think it's a folly to discredit an artist's material once they've gone past the point of creating something worth holding onto. Every time a legacy band releases new music that charts high on fanbase hype and little else, it's genuinely contributing to their legacy even if most people aren't talking about it. Something I've learnt from counting up old songs on iTunes every week for the past 4 years is that the brand of an artist extends far further than a song can (unless it's a song that turns up on Google results for 'wedding songs', but even then most of them are Ed Sheeran so that point still stands). Though what's most popular can seem arbitrary and surprisingly locked in with regards to what does & doesn't stick, it's what's going on behind it that affects things. For instance, INXS are one of Australia's most popular bands ever, and yet "Never Tear Us Apart" is the *only* song of theirs that has ever made my catalogue chart, with an impressive 61 weeks as well. It's obviously because people really like the song, but the song itself endures because the band carries a legacy. If it were the only big hit they ever had, it would likely be relatively lost to the sands of time like Things Of Stone and Wood or Amy Meredith. I think the only reason "Creep" endures as so popular is because there's so much mythos around Radiohead for being critically untouchable, and it just so happens that they have a familiar song that's easy to get into, and thus permeate the feeling of listening to something special (and I do this too, the only Talking Heads song I have in my iTunes library right now is "Road To Nowhere", the only Pixies song is "Where Is My Mind?"). This is all me basically saying that whenever triple j do one of their all time countdowns, "Everlong" inevitably lands really high both as an extension of its quality, but because Foo Fighters are such a monolith in rock music of the last 3 decades and it just so happens that their 2nd album contains a remarkably agreeable song in "Everlong". I don't even need to elaborate on what makes it great, do I? It just fires on all cylinders like there is nothing left to lose, all the guitar & drum fluorishes compliment the song's intensity, and in the space of one song, Dave Grohl justifies everything about his ambitious push to break out from just being the drummer from Nirvana.

Past entries:
1997Monkey Wrench#28
1997My Hero#32
1999Generator#6
1999Stacked Actors#81
2002All My Life#24
2002Low#89
2005No Way Back#66
2007The Pretender#41
2011Bridge Burning#28
2011Rope#40
7. Portishead - All Mine

For a long time, this was my favourite Portishead song, though I'm not sure that will hold water until I get to appraising "Dummy". Either way, as an introduction to their new album, it makes a big impression, so it's easy to see why it's their only top 50 single here. I haven't mentioned it before, but the album cover for "Portishead" is perfect. The black & white aesthetic, the lonely singer on the stage behind the shadowy figure. It really just captures the vibe perfectly. Granted, "All Mine" is something a little different on the album with its bombast, sounding akin to a Bond theme. Even the lyrics support it with the word choices being considerably more dramatic and threatening than a declaration of love probably should be.

Past entries:
1997Cowboys#41
1997Elysium#52
1997Seven Months#64
1997Only You#98
2008The Rip#9
2008Machine Gun#16
6. Kohmi Hirose - Promise

There's a decent chance that you know this song without recognising the name. If you thought I was done with memes then you are sorely mistaken. In a way this perfectly captures 1997 even though it only really became well known around 2007/2008. A key component of my childhood was the video game GoldenEye 007, which in many ways was the must have game of the time, and being the best at it was essential to your social standing. It was, just like this song, released in 1997. A few years later, word got out that weird things happen in the game if you tilt your cartridge, and then with the advent of YouTube, came video footage of just that, where characters would spasm erratically, breaking any sort of facade of seriousness. Someone decided to soundtrack it to the chorus of this song, and thus 'get down' (or 'geddan') was born. I am not actually sure I was aware of this specific meme but I definitely recognised this song. But one man's meme is another man's dream. And just like how for every ironic fan of "Africa" or "All Star" there's heaps of unironic fans, oh boy I'm here for this song unironically. I don't claim to know the musical undercurrents of Japan, but it feels like it makes sense that this came out in 1997, as its flamenco guitar feels very on trend with the time (No Mercy come to mind). The chorus is obviously a bit silly but it's a wonderful encapsulation of intensity and drama. It even ramps things up as it goes on as the backing vocal line is added, which serves as the one thing that's easy to sing along to. It was so weird ranking this next to songs I've knowingly adored for a decade and then some. I'd have liked to put it even higher, but 1997 is the wrong year to have to compete in.
5. The Living End - Prisoner Of Society

It's a pretty common story where an artist lazily knocks out a quick b-side and then it ends up considerably more popular than could be imagined. For as long as The Living End have been around, this will probably always be their zenith. Granted, the version most people know nowadays is not that original rendition. I'm pretty sure that's the version I heard first but I eventually got far more used to the polished up version and it's not easy to go back. The song may largely be brainless anti-authority nonsense, but it just makes it really easy to latch onto. Almost every lyric in this song ends up feeling like a mantra. As a piece of music it's incredibly addictive, a rollercoaster of highs, lows & creamy middles, where there's always something exciting happening. Truly, we live in a prison.

Past entries:
1997Second Solution#16
1998All Torn Down#6
1998West End Riot#31
1998Save The Day#65
2000Pictures In The Mirror#81
2002One Said To The Other#26
2003End Of The World#15
2006Wake Up#79
2008Moment In The Sun#55
2008White Noise#80
2011Song For The Lonely#25
2011Machine Gun#90
4. Björk - Jóga

Once again we encounter holes in my recognition and songs that slip through the cracks. I have a big Like A Version compilation that I see regularly when I sort my library by year, because I'm too lazy to tag everything with the correct year. On that is a cover of this song by Hermitude, and for a long time I'd see that and think, 'aww, why couldn't it be one of the Björk songs I knew. I'm pretty sure I did know this song but once again having obtuse titles makes it harder to remember. Now I just try to remember the words 'State of emergency', and try not to think of The Living End instead. There's good reason why this song is often regarded as a crowning achievement in Björk's discography. There's just so much going on in this song behind what is already a pretty compelling calling card. I'm not sure the delivery actually changes, but once the glitchy beats take hold, there starts to be a captivating waltz behind it. It may feel very Björk Greatest Hits but this state of emergency is where I want to be.

Past entries:
1997All Is Full Of Love#26
1997Bachelorette#75
2001It's Not Up To You#37
2001Hidden Place#63
2001Pagan Poetry#75
3. The Whitlams - Charlie No. 1

When triple j were counting down the voted in poll of favourite Australian albums, they did a gimmick where they would play some of these albums in full. "Eternal Nightcap" was one, and I recall it being somewhat early in the morning, where I heard it via being woken up by my radio alarm. I think I must have missed the start of it because I remember for a while being surprised to have not heard "No Aphrodisiac" (I wasn't aware at the time that it was track 1). Until suddenly, I did hear a strikingly familiar ballad, such was the intensity of my recognition on the very first note that I thought this had to be "No Aphrodisiac". Except that other familiar hook didn't come. I was set agape at just how much I loved a radio staple, that I didn't realise I was listening to the wrong song. It goes without saying that "Charlie No. 1" was that song. It's an important piece of the puzzle, revealing the troubled home situation that causes Charlie's downward spiral, but for the most part I listened to this song just on its own because it carried enough emotional heft like that. I don't know how or why, but the way the piano punctuates the song is just so incredibly moving to me.

Past entries:
1997Melbourne#21
1997You Sound Like Louis Burdett#24
1997No Aphrodisiac#25
1997Buy Now Pay Later (Charlie No. 2)#86
1997Charlie No. 3#92
2002Fall For You#87
2. Radiohead - Exit Music (For A Film)

This song is pivotal in my love of Radiohead. Circa 2009 I had to an extent, bought into the hype, but I still got the impression that they were too out there for me, outside of a few singles. Of all places to have my expectations challenged, it was this song being covered on Australian Idol which made me realise there was more than just those 3 singles on "OK Computer", so I went back and adored the album front to back. This song in particular was a huge favourite for me. I don't think I realised Radiohead were capable of making something so moving in this manner, where the general sparsity completely compliments it. Of course, I won't pretend that I wasn't mainly here for when that's flipped on its head after the quick drum frollick which goes on to punctuate the closing third of the song. Sometimes distilling a song's core down to just a few elements can work wonders, and in many other years, this would be my top pick, alas...

Past entries:
1997Karma Police#9
1997Electioneering#23
1997No Surprises#50
1997Let Down#54
1997The Tourist#62
1997Climbing Up The Walls#68
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93
1. Radiohead - Paranoid Android

It is not a revelation to say that I think a lot about the way I perceive music. About what works, what doesn't work, what the ideal form is, if there even is one. Something else I think a lot about is the way I'm perceived to perceive music. I'm talking about the usual trappings of music fandom, where what people like can be used as a way to categorise them further due to associations that these things draw. It's usually for negative purposes so I try to cut back on the temptation to parrot into it. But still I can't help but be aware of the fact that it exists. Like I don't know how long this piece of writing is going to be, but to someone reading this, I'm probably already fitting the glove that is a Radiohead fan who is so starstruck at how amazing Radiohead is no matter how much of this isn't actually dedicated to that. I think I may have built up that reputation for myself a long time ago which makes it difficult to shake. I may well be ironically furthering this image in someone's head because I chose to explain my position over just assuming a more general role of saying why I like this song. Where it becomes a problem is when it becomes a point of weakness. I'm someone who has a lot of trouble talking about the music I like in front of people because I find it can provide knee-jerk reactions that don't hide true feelings. Part of it is because of those aforementioned associations. If someone asks you what artists you like, the moment you say one of them, they're probably already mentally categorising you as a music fan, and that's only the best case, when it can be put up against outright rejection. That's the sort of thing that can really sting on re-listening, when you begin to associate a song with a comment someone's said, which is kind of why I stopped writing negative reviews, because almost nobody's day is improved by finding out I decided to make the world know that I don't like something, and a lot of the people who do, probably don't deserve gratification to their hatefulness. There's a big sort of miscommunication that happens with this in general I find. It starts with someone finding out I like Radiohead, and using it as a way to retaliate at me, because of course Radiohead fans are defensive towards their sacred cows (this isn't a strawman, it's genuinely happened to me multiple times), and I think people take joy out of bringing them down a peg. Part of this miscommunication is that I think there's a perception that as a Radiohead fan, I find their music to represent the ideal of what music is supposed to be, and thus anyone who disagrees must be fundamentally incorrect. It really isn't that at all. It may well be my ideal, but I'd be hard pressed to suggest that the things that are done in Radiohead songs are the peak representation of the things that all people want to be done in music. The beauty of music is that there is no centralised ideal, and the charts are always interesting in a sense of effectively collating so many different perspectives into one centralised whole, where we may see certain things gain favour, but there's always going to be completely different view points centralised together. It makes my inclusion of so many Radiohead songs on this list become a point of shame, because I fear it represents me as the sort of snobbish music fan that it's associated with. I regretted nominating it into QLVG recently for a similar reason, as well as the general perception that this song encapsulates my music opinion so much that it needed to perform exceedingly well, anything short of that is a source of schaudenfraude that the person running it isn't getting what he wants. Everyone loves music snobs getting pushed off their high horse right? Basically I worry that inadvertedly, the way I approach music makes me seem as if I think I'm above everyone else, adding to further desire to see me knocked off my high horse by saying "Creep" is Radiohead's only good song. Sometimes it's not just music, but I worry my general unfeeling distance I tend to provide, due to my limited social abilities make me seem like a hateful person when really I'm a loving person who just has difficulty expressing it to people. I write this all wearing my favourite shirt which depicts the fictional character I relate to more than anyone else: Napstablook from Undertale. If you aren't aware of that, he's an anxiety-riddled ghost who frequently skips his own turn in battle because he's not feeling up to it, flees from the sight of affection and rejects his own social media friend requests. But before that there was also Marvin the Paranoid Android from Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy (whose first ever voice actor sadly died 2 weeks ago). Once again it's half Radiohead just doing a joke, but he's a character who fits neatly as a titular portion of an album with themes of dystopian isolation. But I don't wanna talk about that. I have to be completely honest and say that the real reason I like this song so much is that it goes so hard. To go back to the earlier point, I wouldn't say that this song represents an ideal in music for me, but this is a ranking of songs by way of what I enjoy the most, and nothing (in 1997 at least) gives me quite as much joy as every time I hear that 10 note riff. It feels like a calling card for the song even though it doesn't really even arrive until the 2 minute mark, and then it's not for another minute until it shows its true form. But then it's not just that riff is it? This is a song that is monumentally stacked with things in it, so I've heard this song like 200 times and I still don't think I've noticed everything that's going on. But I don't even need to do that because this is a song that I was so quickly impressed by that I named it my favourite song of all time roughly 4 months after I first heard it. In a way, that makes researching for this list feel slightly redundant because I spent so many hours poring through an endless list of songs to arrive at a similar conclusion I hurriedly reached a decade ago. Even now I still worry that I'm being monumentally boring with my decision, but really I'm just responding to a primal instinct. Perhaps rather than being an ideal form in music, this song represents my experience with music. A mesmerizing, chaotic stream of sounds that gives me a reason to live, just to see what else is waiting around the corner, or perhaps already exists and I just haven't found it yet.

The worst kept secret of the last...ever since I started doing these lists is that Radiohead have the most entries https://imgur.com/wpqxmGE

Past entries:
1997Exit Music (For A Film)#2
1997Karma Police#9
1997Electioneering#23
1997No Surprises#50
1997Let Down#54
1997The Tourist#62
1997Climbing Up The Walls#68
1997Lucky#71
1997Airbag#89
2000Idioteque#4
2000How To Disappear Completely#9
2000Everything In Its Right Place#13
2000Motion Picture Soundtrack#24
2000Optimistic#46
2000Morning Bell#70
2000The National Anthem#86
2001Pyramid Song#1
2001Life In a Glasshouse#16
2001Morning Bell / Amnesiac#36
2001Knives Out#72
2001Dollars & Cents#90
2003There There#4
20032+2=5#17
2007Nude#18
2007Jigsaw Falling Into Place#21
2007Bodysnatchers#62
200715 Step#80
2007All I Need#92
2011Lotus Flower#89
2015Spectre#98
2016Daydreaming#6
2016Burn the Witch#22
2016Decks Dark#27
2016Identikit#34
2016Present Tense#59
2016The Numbers#93
Thanks HiJinx for your summary of my favourite year in indie music. Nine tracks out of 12 from my favourite album of all time and rightfully so! No Subterranean Homesick Alien

To address a couple of questions raised:
1) I think Prince was still getting his cool back after his plot-losing 'Love Symbol' period, however he wasn't really in the news much during 1997 so I think (!) was at least semi-reverent.
2) I hadn't heard anyone say Ben! Ben! Ben! before 1997 other than my mother
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Ah interesting. The main thing I was getting at is that I see the song labelled as a respectful tribute, but I always wonder if that's in the hindsight that Prince is immensely respected and beloved now, but this is when he was big in the charts with not really his classic material and he might have been seen as a bit of a joke despite it (similar to Michael Jackson), especially in a triple j audience since I assume he wasn't really getting played, and there's always that reputation for making fun of easy targets like that.

Subterranean Homesick Alien was pretty close too!
No problems with that #1 as it is 100% what I would have picked as well.

Also agree that Joga is Bjork's crowning achievement and good to see the Godspeed and Mogwai selections.

Did the Jebediah song usher in the era of the Ben (Folds, Lee, Harper, Kweller)?
Really looking forward to your take on 1996 HiJinx, another fantastic year for music.

Think Ben Folds slightly predated 1997 but will pay the Ben statement!

I think the Gurge woild have done it respectfully and self-deprecatingly.

Oh and good to see Everlong up there. The Foo Fighters were still considered very cool in 1997 (and were at the top of their game) and only started to lose some of that cool in some peoples eyes after There Is Nothing Left To Lose in 1999.

1996 might be a while as I think I'm going to prioritise stuff for 2019 (and the 2010s!) first haha.
I heard Second Solution again a few weeks back, and it has certainly gotten even stronger with age. Much better than Prisoner of Society in my opinion.


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