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RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE - KILLING IN THE NAME (SONG)
Entry:06/06/1993 (Position 49)
Last week in charts:14/11/1993 (Position 45)
Peak:7 (1 weeks)
Weeks:24
Place on best of all time:612 (723 points)
Year:1992
Music/Lyrics:Zack de la Rocha
Thomas Morello
Timothy Commerford
Brad J. Wilk
Producer:Timothy Commerford
Brad J. Wilk
Gggarth
Zack de la Rocha
Thomas Morello
World wide:
fr  Peak: 109 / weeks: 2
nl  Peak: 13 / weeks: 11
be  Peak: 27 / weeks: 2 (Vl)
au  Peak: 7 / weeks: 24
nz  Peak: 8 / weeks: 22

Cover


CD-Single
Epic 658492-2



Cover


CD-Maxi
Live Line LL 15521


TRACKS
02/11/1992
CD-Single Epic 658492-2 (Sony) / EAN 5099765849226
16/05/1993
CD-Single Epic 658492-2 (Sony) [au] / EAN 9399765849223
1. Killing In The Name
5:17
2. Darkness Of Greed
3:42
3. Clear The Lane
3:48
   
1994
Live-Remix - CD-Maxi Live Line LL 15521 / EAN 5450162155219
1. Wake Up (Live 1993)
6:07
2. Settle For Nothing (Live 1993)
5:19
3. Killing In The Nake (Live 1993)
5:15
4. Freedom (Live 1993)
5:48
5. Killing In The Name (Live 1993)
3:07
6. Bullet In The Head (Live 1993)
5:00
7. Killing In The Name (Remix)
15:50
   

AVAILABLE ON FOLLOWING MEDIA
VersionLengthTitleLabel
Number
Format
Medium
Date
5:17Killing In The NameEpic
658492-2
Single
CD-Single
02/11/1992
5:14Rage Against The MachineEpic
472224 2
Album
CD
09/11/1992
Radio4:20Hit Machine Volume 2Columbia
474835-2
Compilation
CD
1993
5:14De Afrekening 5Columbia
COL 474390-2
Compilation
CD
1993
Live5:15Killing In The NameLive Line
15 521
Album
CD
1994
Live3:07Killing In The NameLive Line
15 521
Album
CD
1994
Live 19933:07Killing In The Name [Live-Remix]Live Line
LL 15521
Single
CD-Maxi
1994
Remix15:50Killing In The Name [Live-Remix]Live Line
LL 15521
Single
CD-Maxi
1994
Remix15:50Killing In The NameLive Line
15 521
Album
CD
1994
5:14Grand Theft Auto: San AndreasInterscope
0075021032156
Album
CD
06/12/2004
5:13Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas - Official Soundtrack Box SetInterscope
9864903
Album
CD
06/12/2004
5:13Q - The Album 2008Sony
88697405112
Compilation
CD
27/10/2008
5:14Rage Against The Machine + Evil Empire [2CD]Sony
88697586062
Album
CD
02/10/2009
5:14The CollectionEpic / Legacy
88697689932
Album
CD
28/05/2010
Live 20005:03The CollectionEpic / Legacy
88697689932
Album
CD
28/05/2010
5:13Rage Against The Machine [XX - 20th Anniversary Edition]Epic / Legacy
88765412342
Album
CD
26/11/2012
5:13Rage Against The Machine [XX - Special 20th Anniversary Edition]Epic / Legacy
88765412152
Album
CD
26/11/2012
6:28Rage Against The Machine [XX - Special 20th Anniversary Edition]Epic / Legacy
88765412152
Album
CD
26/11/2012
MUSIC DIRECTORY
Rage Against The MachineRage Against The Machine: Discography / Become a fan
Official Site
RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE IN AUSTRALIAN CHARTS
Singles

TitleEntryPeakweeks
Killing In The Name06/06/1993724
Bulls On Parade07/04/1996296
 
Albums

TitleEntryPeakweeks
Rage Against The Machine13/06/19931222
Evil Empire28/04/1996213
The Battle Of Los Angeles07/11/1999218
Renegades17/12/2000109
SONGS BY RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE
Ashes In The Fall
Beautiful World
Bombtrack
Born As Ghosts
Born Of A Broken Man
Bullet In The Head
Bulls On Parade
Calm Like A Bomb
Clear The Lane
Darkness
Darkness Of Greed
Down On The Street
Down Rodeo
Fistful Of Steel
Freedom
Fuck Tha Police
Guerrilla Radio
Hadda Be Playing On The Jukebox
How I Could Just Kill A Man
I'm Housin'
In My Eyes
Kick Out The Jams
Killing In The Name
Killing In The Name (The Andy Lim Trio feat. Rage Against The Machine)
Know Your Enemy
Maggie's Farm
Maria
Memory Of The Dead (Land And Liberty)
Mic Check
Microphone Fiend
New Millennium Homes
No Shelter
People Of The Sun
Pistol Grip Pump
Renegades Of Funk
Revolver
Roll Right
Settle For Nothing
Sleep Now In The Fire
Snakecharmer
Street Fighting Man
Take The Power Back
Testify
The Ghost Of Tom Joad
The Narrows
Tire Me
Township Rebellion
Vietnow
Voice Of The Voiceless
Wake Up
War Within A Breath
Wind Below
Without A Face
Year Of The Boomerang
Zapata's Blood
ALBUMS BY RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE
Democratic National Convention 2000
End Of The Party - The 1990s Broadcast
Evil Empire
Killing In The Name
Live & Rare
Live At The Grand Olympic Auditorium
Live In Germany 2000
Rage Against The Machine
Rage Against The Machine + Evil Empire
Rage Against The Machine + Evil Empire + The Battle Of Los Angeles
Renegades
The Battle Of Los Angeles
The Battle Of Los Angeles + Renegades
The Collection
DVDS BY RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE
Live At Finsbury Park
Rage Against The Machine
The Battle Of Mexico
 
REVIEWS
Average points: 4.75 (Reviews: 138)
Only the reviews in english are displayed: Show all languages
******
Power!
*
ei meeldi üldse
******
Another track of angst against authority! CLASSIC!<br><br>5 -------> 6
Last edited: 01/10/2014 04:57
*****
This is a great song and really strong and powerful. The music, lyrics and message is brilliant and it's a triumph for organic real music with a meaning. Giving the power back to the people (consumers) who decide what is in the charts and not a major buisness forcing covers and propaganda about what music you should buy. The best number 1 ever. 9 weeks in the UK top 100. UK#25 in '93 > UK #1 in '09 brilliant!! and Ireland#2. The UK Christmas #1 of 2009. 750,000 copies sold in the UK.
Last edited: 01/07/2013 20:32
*****
Epic track.
*
Some of the musical moments are pretty cool but lyrically it's woefully wannabe and the track just becomes very tiresome long before it mercifully ends, mostly due to the constant swearing. Yawn.
Last edited: 30/07/2013 13:54
******
Radm.
Last edited: 14/02/2014 11:58
***
by far their best song (but that's not saying much).
Last edited: 18/02/2012 11:02
******
Awesome!
**
Nothing spectacular and one of those songs that I will never understand the appeal for.
*****
Very rocky
*****
Great song!
*****
Great track, although I found some parts to be a bit bland.
***
Not bad but nothing in it is spectacular imo
*****
5 stars
*****
That bass line is just phenomenal!
****
Quite good considering the style is not generally a favourite of mine, but it somehow works here. Has aged well. 4.4*
***
Not bad but not for me. 2.5
******
I am tempted to drop it down because of the numerous F-bombs towards the end but I just can't. An absolute classic for all time... amazing. <br>
******
Great
*****
Brut de fonderie, super efficace !
******
Just epic, I love this song so much, Just gets you in the mood to party so easily.
******
Bloody brilliant, I absolutely love this track and it carries a strong message about racism by the police force which is still very much prevalent nowadays. An easy 6 stars.
*****
Although he's not on schedule to review it for at least a couple of years. I'll be very interested to read Tom Ewing's Popular entry for this single when he gets around to the end of 2009 and reviews the end result of a public campaign to end the X Factor's strangehold on the UK singles chart around Christmas time by sending this famously aggressive rap-metal classic to #1 in its place instead.<br><br>I can imagine his reaction bearing similarity to his review of The Offspring's "Pretty Fly (For a White Guy)" in which although he understood the band's intent with the song's humour, he's always felt a little uncomfortable with how the song's message was received in the UK. Some understood it as a parody of a white guy who displays an appreciation of hip-hop music to help with his social cred but the shallowness of his appreciation results in him looking like a fool, others viewed the subject as a fool simply because he was taking an interest - however misguided - into The Rap Music in the first place, because rap is still not a """respectable""" genre to like: "the question wasn’t whether you were into rap, but how. In the UK, whether was still a big issue." Rage Against The Machine, being one of the primary figureheads of rap-rock and rap-metal, are an even bigger part of white people's relationship to rap music - they weren't making one-off novelty singles mocking some white people's attempts at appropriating hip-hop, hip-hop *is* an essential part of their sound and identity as a band. And as what feels like an unavoidable result, there's always been huge portions of Rage's audience whom are primarily rock fans still weary of listening to much rap and hip-hop elsewhere - y'know unless it's another rap-rock band or Eminem (sigh). Furthermore, there's Rage's reputation as a heavily political band, and while there's definitely deeper commentary of political topics within their discography, what normally attracts most music fans to Rage Against The Machine - at least from my experience - is more or less their general vibe and attitude - one of massive hostility to authority, and what that "authority" is can be wildly different in the minds of different people. In other words, not everyone listening will be raging against the same machine, and this can leave mantras in this song like the infamously profane "fuck you I don't do what you tell me!" feel almost dangerously generic. It's a line that could be said by any oppressed group retaliating against their oppressors, but also the kind of people The Lonely Island parodied on "Threw It On The Ground" ("I'm not a PART of your SYSTEM!"), or worse - it could even vindicate the worldview of a 4chan edgelord doing or saying anything he can to trigger the libs, despite the song being explicitly against white supremacy. To be clear, I don't consider any of this as a moral failing of the band themselves - it's not like anybody could predict today's media hellscape in 1992, and any rock band with a large audience is going to inevitably have fans with a different worldview to theirs - nor do I want to seem like I'm saying people without super-woke understandings of rap are equvalent with The Worst People on The Internet - they're not, it's usually more in how openly hostile they are to non-rock genres that suggest their chances of turning into the latter, and even then it takes more than music taste to radicalise someone anyway.<br><br>Back to the context of becoming the Christmas #1 of 2009 in the UK. The campaign was of course attractive to more than just the rockists for good reasons - Even as a pop fan, you'd have to admit that The X Factor's strategy of releasing their coronation songs on Christmas week to monopolise the buying habits of the public had undeniably taken the thrill out of seeing what becomes the Christmas #1, a trick they had pulled off four years in a row by this point. The campaign undeniably brought some unpredictability and excitement into the chart many have feared was waning in the digital era. It would be absurdly fallacious to assume that the majority of the people buying "Killing In The Name" that week were staunch rockists who view all modern pop music with derision, but there's always a few that did in a movement like this. "Killing In The Name" was in a way a perfect song for them - it's heavy, aggressive, hostile to authority and from a time before many of the people buying it were even born. Getting a song like that to #1 could feel to an young rock fan as not just a Rage Against the X Factor but a Rage Against Pop Music and if you're reading this, you already know what kind of terrible opinions they have on basically any other type of music they don't care for. The potentially insidious appeal of the campaign may not have been the main part of why it was successful, but they did persist in UK music culture and became perhaps more apparent years later in 2015, when Kanye West was announced headliner of Glastonbury festival and in the sea of vile, awful comments left often by rock fans in the comment sections of articles or on the online petitions against him headlining, I saw the likes of "We managed to stop The X Factor from topping the charts with Rage Against The Machine, we can do this again!" many times, and that ended up souring my memory of the 2009 campaign as one of the most interesting pieces of chart activity in recent times. (Now I know in 2019 Kanye's profile has tanked to the point where many people who defended him in the past - myself included - don't anymore, but his 2015 profile was a different story and even if that happened now the same attitude would still be uncomfortable, if a little muddier on the topic of Kanye himself)<br><br>Writing so much about my feelings on the song in the context of how it became a UK #1 might be a little odd given that I'm not British - in fact have never been to the UK - but the context in how it connects to rockism still resonates with how I've experienced the song - and Rage Against The Machine in general - socially in my own life. In my own experiences, "Killing In The Name" has been one of the 90's rock staples most likely to get played at a party, be it on a playlist or a cover band set or etc. It's effectively erased any desire to listen to the song privately, but also made feel a little weird about how fratboy-ish the crowds can sometimes get when it comes on, which is coumpounded with what I've said above in the second paragraph.<br><br>So why am I still giving it a 5? Feelings about this song in a social context is one thing, but I still view the objective merit of a song to be separate from all that, and I can deny that it's an effective funk-rap-metal song at the end of the day. The sinister triplet in the bass after the loud opening measures is great and the main riff of what the song's based on springs with the right amount of heaviness and bounce. I also like those hits in the post-chorus which are met with Zach de la Rocha whispering "now they do what they told war" which has a more paranoid quality to it, enhanced by adding another vocal hook beside it ("now you're under control") as it builds up. Speaking of, some have taken issue with some one the lines he repeats on this track - myself included obviously with regards to that final lyric, but that's more of it being vulnerable to being appropriated badly more than anything else. But while the lines about police brutality and racism may seem simplistic, they're performed with the right amount of conviction from Rocha and power from the band to sell it. I also like how in the outro after Tom Morello's whammy-pedaling solo and the final f-strike line comes in just how chaotic the band becomes, almost daring to fall apart before coming back in for one more round of riffage. And despite what I've said about hearing the song in public, there are times when at a gig in the company of my friends with a band playing this song who gets the dynamics right, I can in fact forget everything and pogo up-and-down to that ever-profane coda like a 14 year old not wanting to do his homework.
Last edited: 06/02/2019 11:56
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